Why every house should be designed for multigenerational living

In many cultures, multi-generational households are pretty standard; your parents took care of you, and now you take care of them. In China, almost every apartment sold has three bedrooms: one for the parents, one for the kid, and one for grandma.

But in the United States, Canada and many European countries, the natural progression has been to get a job or get married and move out to set up your own household. And from the end of World War II to the low point around 1980, that was pretty much what happened.

However as of late, particularly since the Great Recession, the number of multigenerational households has increased dramatically.

Read Why every house should be designed for multigenerational living by Lloyd Alter at Treehugger.

Advertisements

May 2, 2018 at 10:51 am Leave a comment

Warmshowers connects tired cyclists with local hospitality

 

It’s kind of like couch-surfing, but only for people on bicycles.

Nothing beats a home-cooked meal and a warm shower at the end of a long day in a bike saddle. For most bike travellers, these are rare luxuries, hard to find in a roadside campground. That is why an organization called Warmshowers was created. The online community connects weary cyclists with friendly hosts who know what it’s like to feel worn out and in need of a little comfort. The hosts are able to travel vicariously through their visitors’ experiences, bringing the world to their own doorstep.

Warmshowers has been around since 1993, so it’s not surprising it was covered on TreeHugger more than 10 years ago. At the time, Christine called it “couch-surfing for bicyclists,” and that remains an apt description. The organization has grown immensely since then, although some rules remain the same. Hosts cannot be paid for their hospitality, although it is understood that guests provide a thank you gift of some kind in return or, at the very least, pay the favor forward.

Read Warmshowers connects tired cyclists with local hospitality by Katherine Martinko at Treehugger.

April 30, 2018 at 10:58 am Leave a comment

The Science of Weather and Climate

Wednesday May 2, 7:00 Schnitzels European Flavors, Pitt Street The River Institute’s Science and Nature on Tap speaker series will tackle one of contemporary science’s most important topics.  McGill University professor of Physics and Climate Science author, Dr. Shaun Lovejoy will  visit Schnitzels in Cornwall.
Shaun Lovejoy is Cambridge educated professor of physics and author who teaches at McGill University in Montreal. He is the author of several books and many articles including the book “The weather and climate: Emergent laws and multifractal cascades”, as well as a soon to be published “Weather, Macro-weather, and Climate”.
Analysis of temperature data since 1500 all but rules out the possibility that global warming in the industrial era is just a natural fluctuation in the earth’s climate, according to a recent study by Dr. Shaun Lovejoy. His research represents a new approach to the question of whether global warming in the industrial era has been caused largely by man-made emissions from the burning of fossil fuels.
Rather than using complex computer models to estimate the effects of greenhouse-gas emissions, Lovejoy examines historical data to assess the competing hypothesis: that warming over the past century is due to natural long-term variations in temperature. “This study will be a blow to any remaining climate-change deniers,” Lovejoy says. “Their two most convincing arguments – that the warming is natural in origin, and that the computer models are wrong – are either directly contradicted by this analysis, or simply do not apply to it.”
Sessions are free but seating is limited. To reserve your seat today for this very special session book on-line at http://www.riverinstitute.ca/events , by calling (613) 936-6620 (ext. 229), or via e-mail at kcooper@riverinstitute.ca.

April 27, 2018 at 11:26 am Leave a comment

Don’t Just Plant, Plan!

Not unlike a well-organized closet or a well-designed kitchen, a well-planned food plot is an inviting respite from your daily grind. Before you get caught up in a frenzy of spring planting, step back, take stock and spend a weekend charting a course for the growing season and laying the groundwork for a successful garden

Read Don’t Just Plant, Plan! by Brian Barth at Modern Farmer.

April 25, 2018 at 10:28 am Leave a comment

Many Canadians are recycling wrong, and it’s costing us millions

 

Canadians are throwing too much garbage into their blue bins, sometimes out of laziness or ignorance, but sometimes with the best of intentions. And it’s costing recycling programs millions of dollars a year.

Even a few spoonfuls of peanut butter left in a jar can contaminate a tonne of paper and make it unmarketable — destined for the dump. Same for that glob of yogurt left in the bottom of the container.

Contamination has recently become a much bigger issue because China, the world’s biggest importer of recyclable material, started banning imports of paper with more than 0.5 per cent contamination — a standard that North American cities are struggling to meet.

Read Many Canadians are recycling wrong, and it’s costing us millions by Emily Chung at CBC News.

April 23, 2018 at 10:29 am Leave a comment

Volunteer Opportunity for the Incredible Edible Plant Festival

Monday, April 23, 1:30 pm Cornwall Public Library Might you be interested in helping out at the 6th Incredible Edibles Plant Festival? Everyone is welcome to the open public meeting at the CPL. The festival takes place on Saturday, May 26, 10.30 to 2 in front of the Justice Building. This is an opportunity to help people discover the joy of growing their own food! We give away free pots of vegetable plants, offer gardening advice, plant community gardens and run children’s food and craft activities . The event needs volunteers to help with all of these,(including early set up and take down)?
For more information, please come to the planning meeting, or contact Penny at pennykb@sympatico.ca

April 20, 2018 at 12:42 pm Leave a comment

How a warmer Arctic could intensify extreme weather

Is there a link between the vanishing Arctic sea ice and extreme weather?

Some prominent climate researchers think so. That’s because warming temperatures in the Arctic are altering the behavior of the polar jet stream, a high-altitude river of air that drives weather patterns across the globe. As the winds that propel the jet stream weaken, storms, droughts, and extreme heat and cold move over continents at slower rates, meaning bad weather can stick around for longer.

Eli Kintisch reports aboard the Norwegian research vessel Helmer Hanssen about how changing conditions at the top of the world could be impacting weather far away.

Read How a warmer Arctic could intensify extreme weather at Vox, by Eli Kintisch and Mallory Brangan.

April 18, 2018 at 11:03 am Leave a comment

Older Posts Newer Posts


Make a donation
Find local resources

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 169 other followers

Recent Posts

Transition Network
Transition Initiatives Primer

Archives


%d bloggers like this: