The Easiest Way To Compost

Compost

So you’re ready to take the plunge and start composting. You’ve made the space, and put aside time to figure it out: this is the year. Two deep breaths. Now, how do you do it? Don’t worry! We’ve got you covered.
Here’s What You Need

1. Carbon-rich “brown” materials, such as fall leaves, straw, dead flowers from your garden, and shredded newspaper.

2. Nitrogen-rich “green” materials, such as grass clippings, plant-based kitchen waste (vegetable peelings and fruit rinds, but no meat scraps), or barnyard animal manure (even though its color is usually brown, manure is full of nitrogen like the other “green” stuff). Do not use manure from carnivores, such as cats or dogs.

3. A shovelful or two of garden soil.

4. A site that’s at least 3 feet long by 3 feet wide.

Read The Easiest Way To Compost at Rodale’s Organic Life.

 

June 5, 2017 at 11:09 am Leave a comment

Get active with the Walk and Roll Challenge

June 4- 10 During the week of June 4th to 10th, Cornwall and SDG residents are encouraged to take part in the Walk and Roll Challenge (part of the national Commuter Challenge) by parking the car and using active forms of transportation. The week long event encourages residents and workplaces from Cornwall and SDG to register and then track their active and sustainable trips such as walking, cycling, carpooling, taking transit, jogging, rollerblading, and even carpooling. For more info and to register: http://walkandrollcornwallsdg.ca/

June 2, 2017 at 10:12 am Leave a comment

Combating textile waste

clothingwasteOne of the biggest misconceptions that consumers have is that we should only donate clothes that are gently used. Ninety per cent of all people in Ontario donate at least some of their clothes, but whenever we have a pile of unwanted clothing we sort it based on what we imagine to be valuable and donate only the “good” stuff. The rest goes into the waste bin. Fifteen per cent of all unwanted garments are collected while the vast majority, 85 per cent, ends up in our landfills, taking up valuable space, releasing methane and toxic leachate and contributing to climate change.

While every municipality with populations over 5,000 must operate a blue box recycling program, textiles are on the supplementary list. Yet used clothes are often more valuable than many of the other item categories collected by municipalities. So why are textiles forgotten on our municipal waste diversion list? The good news is that all textiles can be reused or recycled in some way, with pioneering R&D efforts underway to ensure this happens.

Read Combating textile waste by Sabine Weber at Corporate Knights.

May 31, 2017 at 10:48 am Leave a comment

Edible plant fest keeps growing

Experienced and aspiring green thumbs were at the promenade next to city hall on Saturday, to ask questions, learn, have fun, and even take home a plant to care for.
It was the Incredible Edible Plants Festival, hosted by the food action group of Transition Cornwall+ with the support of the All Things Food food network.
The event attracted a steady stream of a few hundred people to browse the booths and activities. MPP Jim Macdonell even arrived to present the organizers with a certificate for bringing the event back for a fifth year.
Organizer Kat Rendek said she was very pleased to see how the event has grown since its humble beginnings.
“The festival has grown considerably through partnerships in the community. Initially, in our first year, it was really just about the plant giveaway,” reflected Rendek.

”But now we have a community garden planting in four different community gardens . . . we also had a huge number of activities this year.”

Read Edible plant fest keeps growing by Alan S. Hale at the Cornwall Standard-Freeholder.

May 29, 2017 at 10:59 am Leave a comment

Incredible Edible Plant Festival 2017

Saturday, May 27,  10:30 – 2:00 340 Pitt Street Grab your garden gloves and head over to the Cornwall Justice Building Plaza (Pitt Street near City Hall) for the 5th Annual Transition Cornwall + Food Action Group Incredible Edible Plant Festival. This year’s festival  will feature our famous vegetable plant give-away and a huge bouquet of free, family-centered activities hosted by TC+ and members of the All Things Food Network.

Activities for the day are HERE>>

May 25, 2017 at 11:27 am Leave a comment

17 Vegetables for a Shady Garden

A shady yard doesn’t have to dash your vegetable gardening dreams. There are actually a number of vegetables that will do quite well with just a few hours of sun each day. Though these partial-sun plants may not produce the bountiful harvests that they would in full sun, they will still do quite well.

Most vegetables love the sun, and require a full day of good light to flourish.

 However, if you have a spot in the yard that gets just 4-6 hours of sun each day, you can still have a great little veggie garden. Here are some plants that should thrive.
  • Asparagus: It will take two to three years before your asparagus starts to produce, but it’s definitely worth the wait. Choose a good patch where it can run and grow, and you will be greeted with fresh stalks each spring. Asparagus plants can produce for up to 20 years!
  • Beans: Try beans that grow in a bush, rather than pole beans. These tend to do much better in the shade, and will grow quickly.

Read 17 Vegetables for a Shady Garden by Erin Huffstetler at The Balance.

May 24, 2017 at 11:31 am Leave a comment

Life in a ‘degrowth’ economy, and why you might actually enjoy it

What does genuine economic progress look like? The orthodox answer is that a bigger economy is always better, but this idea is increasingly strained by the knowledge that, on a finite planet, the economy can’t grow for ever.

When one first hears calls for degrowth, it is easy to think that this new economic vision must be about hardship and deprivation; that it means going back to the stone age, resigning ourselves to a stagnant culture, or being anti-progress. Not so.

Renewable energy cannot sustain an energy-intensive global society of high-end consumers. A degrowth society embraces the necessity of “energy descent”, turning our energy crises into an opportunity for civilisational renewal.

In a degrowth society we would aspire to localise our economies as far and as appropriately as possible. This would assist with reducing carbon-intensive global trade, while also building resilience in the face of an uncertain and turbulent future.

Read Life in a ‘degrowth’ economy, and why you might actually enjoy it by Samuel Alexander at The Conversation.

May 22, 2017 at 11:54 am Leave a comment

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