Posts filed under ‘Trees’

How to Tap Trees for Syrup

To get started, follow these simple steps, and be sure to disconnect the tap when the tree’s leaf buds swell, a sign that the sap will soon turn bitter. If done correctly, the process won’t hurt the tree. Think of it as an arboreal version of donating blood, only far more delicious.

I make my own syrup now, albeit from the black walnuts in my neighbor’s North Carolina yard. Other trees that produce sweet saps include sycamores, butternuts, and shagbark hickories, as well as all manner of birches, box elders, and maples. Just be forewarned: Many of these alternatives contain less sugar than the aptly named sugar maple, so you’ll have to boil a lot of sap to yield a very small amount of syrup.

Read How to Tap Trees for Syrup by Frank Hyman at The Modern Farmer.

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February 28, 2018 at 11:31 am Leave a comment

A eureka moment for the planet: we’re finally planting trees again

Illustration by Mitch Blunt

After centuries of bad stewardship, communities are at last starting to see the benefits of forests. China plans to plant forests the size of Ireland. Latin American countries have pledged to restore 20m hectares of degraded forest and African countries more than 100m hectares. India is to plant 13m hectares, and on a single day last year 1.5 million people planted 66m trees in Madhya Pradesh alone.

This enthusiasm for a greener world, expressed in trees, is inspiring and overdue. For 200 years forested countries barely knew what to do with their trees. They were treated as expendable and a waste of space. But in a great cultural shift, they have changed from being dark and fearsome places to semi-sacred and untouchable.

And why not? In this new ecological age, we have learned that trees have far more value than providing timber: they keep soils moist, prevent floods and provide shelter, store carbon, beautify landscapes, protect water sources, increase biodiversity, improve conservation and induce human wellbeing.

Read A eureka moment for the planet: we’re finally planting trees again by John Vidal at The Guardian.

February 14, 2018 at 11:02 am Leave a comment

Urban Forestry Toolkit

Urban forests play a vital role in helping communities adapt to and mitigate climate change, reduce air pollution, sequester carbon and save energy through natural heating and cooling. But urban forests are facing increasingly difficult growing conditions. Exotic pests, more frequent and severe storms, and the loss of soils in urban developments all contribute to stressed urban forests. In order to contribute to healthy, resilient communities, these valuable assets need to be managed proactively and supported consistently across the province.

Green Infrastructure Ontario’s urban forestry toolkit is a set of documents that support those working to improve urban forest management across the province. This toolkit builds upon our 2015 report Ontario’s Urban Forests: Call to Action and was developed with input from professionals around the province.

The first piece of the toolkit can help build the case for the value that urban forests provide as a municipal asset – with the goal of integrating urban forest management into municipal asset management plans. Read the bulletin on communicating the benefits of the urban forest in a municipal context HERE>>.

The second document in our toolkit helps urban forest managers understand how urban forest assets fit into the municipal asset management planning process. Read the urban forest asset managment primer HERE>>.

Read the full article HERE>>

January 10, 2018 at 8:28 am Leave a comment

How to make a safe, successful home for our feathered friends

House Wren

For many species of birds, there is a shortage of great places to nest. There may be birds that would love to call your habitat home, but they have a specific nesting requirement which needs to be met. Birdhouses can be placed in backyards, schoolyards, parks, orchards, farms, pastures, cemeteries, woodlots, deserts, cities…you name it. Support more nesting birds, and give a bird a home. Use these resources to become the ultimate nest box landlord; find out what features make a birdhouse ideal, which species you can attract to your area, and how to troubleshoot any problems that arise.

Read How to make a safe, successful home for our feathered friends at nestbox.org

November 1, 2017 at 10:51 am Leave a comment

Revitalized eco-system

Twenty years ago, the stretch of land between Lamoureux Park and the bridge to Cornwall Island was a brown wasteland where the natural ecosystem had been stripped away by industrial pollution.

Then, in 1997, the Raisin Region Conservation Authority with funding from the Cornwall Rotary Club put in the rushing creek that exists there today in an effort to restore the original ecosystem. This area would then became known as the Rotary Eco-Gardens.

Two decades later, on Sunday, Transition Cornwall+ Tree Action Arbre organized a guided tour of the eco-gardens with one of the scientists who originally spearheaded the project. Organizer Susan Towndrow said the walk was about admiring the handiwork of all the people who worked hard to revitalize the riverside ecosystem.

Read Revitalized eco-system by Alan S. Hale at the Cornwall Standard-Freeholder.

 

 

 

October 16, 2017 at 11:02 am Leave a comment


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