Posts filed under ‘Relocalization’

Stop the Leakage: How food-centered urban design solves economic challenges

Stop the Leakage: How food-centered urban design solves economic challengesWhat happens when you eat the wrong food over and over again? We call it “leakage.” Leakage is when capital exits the economy rather than remaining in it. Our current food system as designed (or left un-designed) is a constant source of leakage for our cities and a missed opportunity for urban planners.

What if city designs included space for urban farming to provide a percentage of the calories required by their inhabitants? What if the community saw urban farming as an opportunity for economic growth and employment? What if the local government spent the same amount of money on the education, distribution, and land leasing to create food related jobs as it did on to attracting big businesses?

Let’s consider how much money could be kept in the local economy by creating our own urban food plan, giving local farmers the opportunity to supply the food sold at local grocery stores and restaurants.

Read Stop the Leakage: How food-centered urban design solves economic challenges by Nathan Pickard at Strong Towns.

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February 19, 2018 at 12:20 pm Leave a comment

Our Top 10 Most Read Posts of 2017

These are among the pieces that appealed the most to Transition Cornwall+ readers in 2017. Maybe you missed a few, or worth another read as we head into a new year?

#10: The Monster Footprint of Digital Technology The power consumption of our high-tech machines and devices is hugely underestimated.

#9: Truly Sustainable Economic Development For those of us thinking about ways to foster local, sustainable, green businesses, here are some wise words.

#8: What Kind of Housing Do Aging Boomers Need?…the obsession with wide doors with lever handles and corridors connecting the garage to the house is misplaced.

#7: Karim Sulayma – I Trust You “For me, one of the key things that needs to underpin our work and our movements over the next 4 years is empathy”

#6: Now is the Time to Think About Your Fall Garden Cool autumn weather favors a long list of leafy greens and root crops, from spinach and kale to radishes and rutabagas.

#5: Combating Textile Waste One of the biggest misconceptions that consumers have is that we should only donate clothes that are gently used.

#4: Beyond the Blue Box The government’s new Waste-Free Ontario Act and Strategy for a Waste- Free Ontario set an ambitious goal of a circular economy that sends zero waste to landfill.

#3: How to Encourage Entrepreneurship in Your Townnine different ideas for promoting entrepreneurship, within both government and the private sector.

#2: The New Consumerism: Redefining Ownership, Values and Priorities  As consumers reassess their priorities and increasingly ask themselves what they truly value, a host of major consumer trends have emerged…

#1: TLTI Thinking Tiny (Homes)  When it comes to new housing, the Township of Leeds and the Thousand Islands is thinking small. Tiny, in fact.

December 27, 2017 at 11:41 am Leave a comment

Long Sault workshop about bringing local food into the sharing economy

 There’s a food revolution going on, and several dozen guests at a first-time seminar on Thursday were finding out ways to get more deeply involved in it.

The Sprouting New Connections: Scaling Up event was hosted by All Things Food/Bouffe 360, in partnership with several organizations.

Talking about the sharing economy and the role technology is playing in it, keynote speaker Marcia Woods, CEO and co-founder of Barrie-based Fresh Spoke, told the gathering “it’s bloody well time we take advantage of this opportunity and apply it to local food.”

Fresh Spoke, which has an Eastern Ontario regional ambassador, says it’s reinventing the supply chain and giving local producers a new way to get food orders where they need to go, providing a marketplace platform that connects people with local producers and simplifies the order, payment and delivery process for buyers and sellers.

Read Long Sault workshop about bringing local food into the sharing economy by Todd Hambleton at the Standard-Freeholder.

 

October 23, 2017 at 10:58 am Leave a comment

What Quebec Can Teach Us About Creating a More Equitable Economy

Quebec’s social economy (also translated as “solidarity economy”) extends far beyond the province’s two major cities, and includes manufacturing, agricultural cooperatives, daycare centers, homecare services, affordable housing, social service initiatives, food co-ops, ecotourism, arts programs, public markets, media, and funeral homes. The capital that fuels all this economic activity comes from union pension funds, nonprofit loan funds, credit unions, government investment, and philanthropy.

Each enterprise involves a cooperative or non-profit organization — which together make up 8-10 percent of the province’s GDP. More than 7,000 of these “social economy” enterprises ring up $17 billion in annual sales and hold $40 billion in assets (Canadian dollars). They account for about 215,000 jobs across Quebec.

Read What Quebec Can Teach Us About Creating a More Equitable Economy by Jay Walljasper  at Shareable.

September 6, 2017 at 10:56 am Leave a comment

New winery in South Dundas Township

Could Eastern Ontario become the next winery tour location like the Niagara Region or Prince Edward County? It is possible with the opening of a new winery, Stone Crop Acres Winery.

Owner Norene Hyatt-Gervais said she has been working on opening up the new winery for a number of years.

Right now it is just a vineyard and winery, but Hyatt-Gervais said they have plans to make the vineyard into an event location hosting weddings and other events. There is also a house on the lot that can be used as a bed & breakfast.

In the meantime, the winery offers wine tasting, and sales by the glass and bottle (updated July 31, Ed.).

The winery is open from Wednesday until Sunday from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. Friday hours are 2 p.m. until 6 p.m. The winery is located in Morrisburg on Smith Road, just north of Highway 401.

Read the full article New winery in South Dundas Township by Alan S. Hale at the Cornwall Standard-Freeholder.

July 31, 2017 at 9:44 am Leave a comment

Food and agriculture development officer hired for Cornwall and Stormont, Dundas, Glengarry

Sarah Chisholm on right.

A local food and agriculture advisory council has just been created, that will aim to improve the agriculture and food economy in Stormont, Dundas, and Glengarry.

The initiative was co-ordinated by All Things Food and the Social Development Council of Cornwall and Area. With a grant from the Eastern Ontario Development Program, the council was able to hire a food and agriculture development officer.

Sarah Chisholm Ryder, who was born and raised in the area, will work for the next 18 months on issues the council finds pressing in the community. Chisholm Ryder formerly worked for Canadian Organic Growers, and has come back home to focus on local food issues.

Chisholm Ryder said she wants to focus on helping SDG consumers understand how they can support local producers and keep money within the community, without wildly changing shopping or consumption habits

Read the full article: Food and agriculture development officer hired for Cornwall and Stormont, Dundas, Glengarry by Rachel Faber at The Cornwall Standard-Freeholder.

July 19, 2017 at 10:21 am Leave a comment

Strength Test #1: How’s your Main Street doing?

“Take a photo of your main street at midday. Does the picture show more people than cars?”

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This is the first item on the Strength Test for a reason. It helps us understand on a very basic level whether your town is filled with cars passing through, or people enjoying your city center as a destination. At Strong Towns, we call humans the “indicator species of economic health.” If you’ve got a lot of them walking around, visiting your town’s businesses, enjoying your town’s amenities and living in your town’s homes, you’re well on your way to being a strong town. That means you have an economic base to support your community and people who genuinely want to live in your place and contribute to it.

On the other hand, if your main street is devoid of people and merely a thoroughfare for cars, that tells us about your town’s auto-dependence (which makes infrastructure costs expensive) and it tells us about the tax base of your community. In our analyses of tax value per acre in city after city, we find that downtown cores and main streets are the most economically productive places.

Read Strength Test #1: How’s your Main Street doing? by Rachel Quedno at Strong Towns.

June 26, 2017 at 10:59 am Leave a comment

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