Posts filed under ‘Relocalization’

Small Businesses Can Save Your Community

 Small business districts lend character to a community and keep profits recirculating in the local economy. Photo credit: Johnny Sanphillippo Small businesses can be underappreciated and under-supported, and that’s a shame. After all, when a downtown is filled with cool coffee shops, locally owned restaurants, microbreweries, and quirky boutiques—together with plenty of strong non-retail players like architects, ad agencies, and attorneys—that downtown is often the heart and soul of a vibrant community.

A strong small business presence—especially one that thrives in the context of a busy, livable, walkable downtown—is what gives a community its character. It creates that sense of “place” that attracts tourists, young people and empty nesters (increasing numbers of both groups want to live downtown), a talented workforce, and yes, bigger businesses and other investors who drive further growth.

Read Small Businesses Can Save Your Community by Quint Studer at Strong Towns.

Advertisements

August 8, 2018 at 10:53 am Leave a comment

Stop the Leakage: How food-centered urban design solves economic challenges

Stop the Leakage: How food-centered urban design solves economic challengesWhat happens when you eat the wrong food over and over again? We call it “leakage.” Leakage is when capital exits the economy rather than remaining in it. Our current food system as designed (or left un-designed) is a constant source of leakage for our cities and a missed opportunity for urban planners.

What if city designs included space for urban farming to provide a percentage of the calories required by their inhabitants? What if the community saw urban farming as an opportunity for economic growth and employment? What if the local government spent the same amount of money on the education, distribution, and land leasing to create food related jobs as it did on to attracting big businesses?

Let’s consider how much money could be kept in the local economy by creating our own urban food plan, giving local farmers the opportunity to supply the food sold at local grocery stores and restaurants.

Read Stop the Leakage: How food-centered urban design solves economic challenges by Nathan Pickard at Strong Towns.

February 19, 2018 at 12:20 pm Leave a comment

Our Top 10 Most Read Posts of 2017

These are among the pieces that appealed the most to Transition Cornwall+ readers in 2017. Maybe you missed a few, or worth another read as we head into a new year?

#10: The Monster Footprint of Digital Technology The power consumption of our high-tech machines and devices is hugely underestimated.

#9: Truly Sustainable Economic Development For those of us thinking about ways to foster local, sustainable, green businesses, here are some wise words.

#8: What Kind of Housing Do Aging Boomers Need?…the obsession with wide doors with lever handles and corridors connecting the garage to the house is misplaced.

#7: Karim Sulayma – I Trust You “For me, one of the key things that needs to underpin our work and our movements over the next 4 years is empathy”

#6: Now is the Time to Think About Your Fall Garden Cool autumn weather favors a long list of leafy greens and root crops, from spinach and kale to radishes and rutabagas.

#5: Combating Textile Waste One of the biggest misconceptions that consumers have is that we should only donate clothes that are gently used.

#4: Beyond the Blue Box The government’s new Waste-Free Ontario Act and Strategy for a Waste- Free Ontario set an ambitious goal of a circular economy that sends zero waste to landfill.

#3: How to Encourage Entrepreneurship in Your Townnine different ideas for promoting entrepreneurship, within both government and the private sector.

#2: The New Consumerism: Redefining Ownership, Values and Priorities  As consumers reassess their priorities and increasingly ask themselves what they truly value, a host of major consumer trends have emerged…

#1: TLTI Thinking Tiny (Homes)  When it comes to new housing, the Township of Leeds and the Thousand Islands is thinking small. Tiny, in fact.

December 27, 2017 at 11:41 am Leave a comment

New winery in South Dundas Township

Could Eastern Ontario become the next winery tour location like the Niagara Region or Prince Edward County? It is possible with the opening of a new winery, Stone Crop Acres Winery.

Owner Norene Hyatt-Gervais said she has been working on opening up the new winery for a number of years.

Right now it is just a vineyard and winery, but Hyatt-Gervais said they have plans to make the vineyard into an event location hosting weddings and other events. There is also a house on the lot that can be used as a bed & breakfast.

In the meantime, the winery offers wine tasting, and sales by the glass and bottle (updated July 31, Ed.).

The winery is open from Wednesday until Sunday from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. Friday hours are 2 p.m. until 6 p.m. The winery is located in Morrisburg on Smith Road, just north of Highway 401.

Read the full article New winery in South Dundas Township by Alan S. Hale at the Cornwall Standard-Freeholder.

July 31, 2017 at 9:44 am Leave a comment

How to Encourage Entrepreneurship in Your Town

…nine different ideas for promoting entrepreneurship, within both government and the private sector.

street-festivalA strong town needs strong local businesses. Local businesses provide jobs and opportunities for wealth creation. They can become a draw, encouraging visitors from outside your community, as well as a way for community members to support each other by buying local. Only with a thriving locally-based economy—one that isn’t owned or propped up by someone six states away—can we succeed in creating sustainable jobs and lasting economic prosperity.

Entrepreneurship is a hot word these days. Lots of towns say they would like to attract more entrepreneurs and grow their small business communities. But how do you do it? There are many ways to encourage entrepreneurship in your community, both through government leadership and private sector/neighborhood-level work.

THE GOVERNMENT’S ROLE IN ENCOURAGING ENTREPRENEURSHIP

1. Adjust zoning codes to reduce business costs.

Do your zoning codes allow for mixed-use buildings where a shop owner runs her business on the first floor and lives upstairs? Are there minimum parking requirements for new businesses? Are food trucks permitted in your community? These are good questions to ask if you want to encourage small business growth. Buying or renting and renovating a building for a new business can be extremely costly. If your community allows for creative use of space, diverse income streams and smaller options than the typical stand-alone store, you lower the barriers to entry for small business owners.

2. Help facilitate walkable business districts.

Walkability is a huge factor in small business success and can create fertile soil for entrepreneurship to thrive. In a concentrated, walkable neighborhood with shops and restaurants, passersby are far more likely to frequent multiple businesses than if they were just driving to a specific store in an auto-oriented area.

Read How to Encourage Entrepreneurship in Your Town by Rachel Quednau at Strong Towns.

February 20, 2017 at 12:04 pm Leave a comment

Market demographics in South Stormont

marketIt’s been a long time in the making, and James Loucks is about to realize his vision. Loucks has been working on his Community Market idea for three years and on Saturday, Aug. 27 he is opening the doors to the community. Located on County Road 36, the market will be open seven days a week, all year round.

“What we are doing is trying to keep things local,” said Loucks. “So we reached out to all the local people who produce anything. Be it vegetables, canning, honey, maple syrup or local artisans. We hopefully will have all of them together here. The store is going to be very unique because it’s all local.”

Read Market demographics in South Stormont by Lois Ann Baker at the Cornwall Standard-Freeholder.

August 31, 2016 at 11:28 am Leave a comment

Organic grows at Hildebrand Farms near Long Sault

skyeHoping to promote healthy eating to local communities was the driving force behind Bryan Hildebrand’s idea to start an organic farm.

Hildebrand Farms began in 2010 due to Hildebrand’s interest in organic farming. Hildebrand recruited his father, Len, for support and influence and the plan was put into motion. With the help of his dad and kids Jayde and Skye, the farm is in full swing.

Hildebrand Farms specializes in fruits, mainly black raspberry, blueberry, strawberry, plums, pears and cherries all over acres of rolling orchards. They also produce organic vegetables and nuts.

You can pick your own at Hildebrand, but if that isn’t for you, they are also a presence at the Long Sault Farmers’ Market and the Monkland Market.

Read Organic grows at Hildebrand Farms near Long Sault by Lois Ann Baker at The Standard-Freeholder.

May 11, 2016 at 10:42 am Leave a comment

Older Posts


Make a donation
Find local resources

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 176 other followers

Recent Posts

Transition Network

Recommended Reading

Transition Initiatives Primer

Archives


%d bloggers like this: