Posts filed under ‘Heart/Soul’

What keeps me going

There are a few things that keep me going through these difficult times and which keep me focused on what I can do to help.  The first is that you never know where the tipping points are.  You never know who will see a project you are doing and be inspired, who might hear the story of what you’re doing, and where it might go.  One Transition group in Berlin planted 26 fruit trees in their local park.  A year later their Council passed a law to say all new Council landscaping had to be edible species.  Things can tip, and they do so unpredictably.

Read What keeps me going by Rob Hopkins, Transition Town co-founder, at RobHopkins.net

June 7, 2017 at 10:43 am Leave a comment

The Creativity Crisis | Michael Moynihan | TEDxBowdoinCollege

Michael Moynihan, the Vice President of Marketing at LEGO Systems, Inc, revisits the creativity crisis and the state of American ingenuity in this TEDx Talk. He underscores the importance of creativity in this increasingly unstable world and suggests how we can all train ourselves in the art of creativity to prepare for the future.

Michael Moynihan is Vice President of Global Marketing Excellence and Partnerships for The LEGO Group, the world’s second largest toy company.

May 17, 2017 at 10:25 am Leave a comment

Building Community from Your Front Porch

“Hi, neighbor!” After work Michelle Colussi’s husband sits on the front steps, attracting visitors young and old. This bit of neighborliness encourages relationships which come in handy — like bailing out one another’s houses when the nearby creek flooded. Co-founder of Transition Victoria (BC), Michelle organized her neighbors to join in a five-week “Transition Street” initiative to discuss and improve household practices around conserving water, growing food, and reducing waste, energy and transport.

Resilient Streets Toolkit HERE>>

 

April 3, 2017 at 10:27 am Leave a comment

Despair is Not a Strategy: 15 principles of hope

If you’re out there trying to change your neighborhood, community, city, country, or the world then this is for you. In moments when everything seems hopeless, read this to get your hope on.

1. Hope can co-exist with other feelings. Grief and hope can co-exist. Fear and hope can co-exist. Disappointment and hope can co-exist. Sadness and hope can co-exist. As poet Yehuda Amichai writes, “A man doesn’t have time in his life to have time for everything. He doesn’t have seasons enough to have a season for every purpose. Ecclesiastes was wrong about that. A man needs to love and to hate at the same moment, to laugh and cry with the same eyes, with the same hands to throw stones and to gather them, to make love in war and war in love.”

Read Despair is Not a Strategy: 15 principles of hope by Abby Brockman at Medium.

Hat tip to Transition Brockville for the link!

March 15, 2017 at 11:29 am Leave a comment

Ten Climate-Conscious Parents on Talking to Kids about Global Warming

walkingNobody wants to frighten their kids. (We know even the most reasonable adults are shut down by fear.) But as the stakes grow more stark and the politics get more divisive, it’s more crucial than ever that we bring the full force of our emotions to this fight and that we raise active, community-minded, and environmentally-aware citizens. And, I believe, talking to our kids is one way to focus all our own difficult and powerful feelings in a way that fuels rather than saps our civic and political engagement.

Think about it: dealing with climate change is about things kids already know well. It’s about cleaning up our messes; about the sun, wind, air, water, and our own bodies; it’s about treating all people with respect and dignity, about stopping bullies; about sharing; and also about making rules that keep us safe — and making sure everyone follows the same rules! Young people are naturally curious, observant, and creative — they can get excited about nature, science, and new ideas.

Read Ten Climate-Conscious Parents on Talking to Kids about Global Warming by Anna Fahey at The Tyee.

March 1, 2017 at 11:05 am Leave a comment

Karim Sulayman – I trust you

“For me, one of the key things that needs to underpin our work and our movements over the next 4 years is empathy.  According to Roman Krznaric in his book ‘Empathy: why it matters and how to get it’, empathy is:

“The art of stepping imaginatively into the shoes of another person, understanding their feelings and perspectives, and using that understanding to guide your actions”.

…it is clear the empathy needs to come from us.  As does the rebuilding of our collective imagination.  From the networks we build.  The projects we establish.  The connections we make.  The conversations we have. The initiatives that start with the needs of those around us.  I loved this video I saw recently, a powerful taste of empathy-building (Rob Hopkins):”

January 23, 2017 at 11:52 am Leave a comment

Sustainable Activism: Managing Hope and Despair in Social Movements

activismSustainable activism has what (Antonio) Gramsci called a ‘pessimism of the intellect’ which can avoid wishful thinking and face reality as squarely as possible. However it also retains an ‘optimism of the will’, an inner conviction that things can be different. By holding optimism and pessimism in tension, sustainable activism is better able to handle despair, and it has less need to resort to binary thinking as a way of engaging with reality. It can hold contradictions so that they don’t become either/or polarities and can work both in and against the system

… sustainable activism holds that it is never too late. In the context of climate change it is able to face the truth that some irreversible processes of change are already occurring; that the two degrees limit in the increase in global temperatures agreed at the 2015 Paris climate conference may not be achieved; that bad outcomes are inevitable, and that some are already happening. Nevertheless it also insists that this makes our struggles all the more vital to reduce the scale and significance of these future outcomes, to fight for the ‘least-worst’ results we can achieve, and to ensure that the world of our grandchildren and their children is as habitable as possible.

Read Sustainable Activism: Managing Hope and Despair in Social Movements by Paul Hoggett, Rosemary Randall at OpenDemocracy.

December 19, 2016 at 11:57 am Leave a comment

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