Posts filed under ‘Heart/Soul’

Changemakers

Image: front coverWith every news report, the world seems to be careening off the rails. It’s all too easy to slip into despair waiting for co-opted, self-serving governments to act.

The antidote to fear and despair is hope and action. We each hold the power to make personal changes that can drive local changes and cascade into large-scale social transformation.

This is the guidebook for ordinary people who want to create a new society now. The first section explores the idea of transformative change — what it is, what difference it makes, and how it is connected to learning.

Read more about this new book HERE>>

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June 27, 2018 at 10:53 am Leave a comment

10 ways to have a better conversation – Celeste Headlee TED talk

When your job hinges on how well you talk to people, you learn a lot about how to have conversations — and that most of us don’t converse very well. Celeste Headlee has worked as a radio host for decades, and she knows the ingredients of a great conversation: Honesty, brevity, clarity and a healthy amount of listening. In this insightful talk, she shares 10 useful rules for having better conversations. “Go out, talk to people, listen to people,” she says. “And, most importantly, be prepared to be amazed.”

June 25, 2018 at 10:31 am Leave a comment

Connecting nature, culture and community

This Thursday is Summer Solstice; the longest day of the year and the official beginning of the summer season. It also happens to be National Indigenous Peoples Day, and Cornwall Transition+ is planning events throughout the day to celebrate all three aspects.

The events’ head organizer, Susan Towndrow, said the group wanted to plan a day that would help people get back in tune with nature.

“This is the longest day of the year so we had this idea of celebrating the sunrise and the sunset as a way of connecting people with nature and bringing us back into the rhythms of life,” she said.

The day will start bright and early at 5 a.m. with a Tai Chi session in Lamoureux Park led by Fung Loy Kok Taoist Tai Chi. People will be meeting by the gazebo at the boat launch, and beginners are encouraged to come out to greet the sun as well.

Read Connecting nature, culture and community by Alan S. Hale in the Cornwall Standard-Freeholder.

June 20, 2018 at 10:01 am Leave a comment

Medusa’s Curse: The Necessity of Art in the Climate Struggle

Because I am a literary writer, writing about climate justice, people often ask me, What is the importance of the arts in the climate struggle? I turn to Friedrich Nietzsche, the nineteenth century German philosopher.

“We have art in order not to die of the truth,” he wrote.

So then. What are these lethal truths, the truths that break our hearts, sap our spirits, and turn us to stone? How can art save us in the face of those truths? Those are my two questions.

  1. What are the paralyzing truths that the world faces?

Number one. That we have the good fortune to have been born into the Cenozoic Era, when evolution has achieved its greatest fullness of flowering, what theologian Thomas Berry called the most “lyric period in Earth history.”

Imagine our good fortune, to live in the time of thrush-song and thirty thousand species of orchids, the time of small laughing children and whales that teach each other to sing. The fate of these lives is not a matter of indifference or economic expedience. These lives, human or otherwise, are the irreplaceable consequence of planetary creativity over four billion years. And they are the progenitors of everything that will grow on the face of the Earth.

Read Medusa’s Curse: The Necessity of Art in the Climate Struggle by Katherine Dean Moore at Resilience.org

May 23, 2018 at 9:46 am Leave a comment

The High Cost of an Easy-Care, Low-Maintenance World

Image result for easy care clothes on hangers

As it turns out, maintenance has gotten a bad wrap. Maintenance is really a form of caring. Modern philosophers bemoan our love of material things. But I believe that we modern, industrialized people do not actually love material things. We wouldn’t treat material things the way we do if we truly loved and cared for them.

By abandoning the duty of maintenance we owe to the objects in our lives, we are distancing ourselves from the physical world and essentially sending the entropy elsewhere for someone else to deal with, whether human or non-human

Easy care and low maintenance are merely local phenomena. Once we pull back and see the bigger picture, the entropy produced by them creates a maintenance burden on others, on society and on other living organisms and natural systems.

Read The High Cost of an Easy-Care, Low-Maintenance World by Kurt Cobb at Resource Insights.

March 28, 2018 at 10:23 am Leave a comment

Sarah Woods on imagination and “the crisis of what comes next”.

Essentially we have all these really big stories that we try to engage people with, but they’re distant from us perhaps in space and time. We’ve got more pressing things in our lives. It’s very hard to make that sort of stuff stick unless you can connect it to people’s lives and to where people are.

So, start from the individual, start from the personal, and look at what are our connections, as individuals and communities, to those bigger picture? Then as a group of people, how can we connect with it and actually take action? That works really well, because people do want to create change, but these things are so massive that they disable us continually, don’t they?

We’re at a turning point now, it feels to me, because lots of people are starting to talk about the story. People talking about story more is an indication that people are wanting to imaginatively engage more. We’re in unhelpful boxes that are dividing us from the possibility of the plurality of story and essentially from each other.

Read Sarah Woods on imagination and “the crisis of what comes next” at Rob Hopkins blog.

 

March 5, 2018 at 11:54 am Leave a comment

Our Top 10 Most Read Posts of 2017

These are among the pieces that appealed the most to Transition Cornwall+ readers in 2017. Maybe you missed a few, or worth another read as we head into a new year?

#10: The Monster Footprint of Digital Technology The power consumption of our high-tech machines and devices is hugely underestimated.

#9: Truly Sustainable Economic Development For those of us thinking about ways to foster local, sustainable, green businesses, here are some wise words.

#8: What Kind of Housing Do Aging Boomers Need?…the obsession with wide doors with lever handles and corridors connecting the garage to the house is misplaced.

#7: Karim Sulayma – I Trust You “For me, one of the key things that needs to underpin our work and our movements over the next 4 years is empathy”

#6: Now is the Time to Think About Your Fall Garden Cool autumn weather favors a long list of leafy greens and root crops, from spinach and kale to radishes and rutabagas.

#5: Combating Textile Waste One of the biggest misconceptions that consumers have is that we should only donate clothes that are gently used.

#4: Beyond the Blue Box The government’s new Waste-Free Ontario Act and Strategy for a Waste- Free Ontario set an ambitious goal of a circular economy that sends zero waste to landfill.

#3: How to Encourage Entrepreneurship in Your Townnine different ideas for promoting entrepreneurship, within both government and the private sector.

#2: The New Consumerism: Redefining Ownership, Values and Priorities  As consumers reassess their priorities and increasingly ask themselves what they truly value, a host of major consumer trends have emerged…

#1: TLTI Thinking Tiny (Homes)  When it comes to new housing, the Township of Leeds and the Thousand Islands is thinking small. Tiny, in fact.

December 27, 2017 at 11:41 am Leave a comment

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