Providing high-quality food for your family year-round takes foresight and planning, plus healthy doses of commitment and follow-through. Whether you grow as much of your food as you can or you source it from local producers, the guidelines here will help you decide how much to produce or purchase. The charts linked to in “Plan How Much to Grow” later in this article will also help you estimate how much space you’ll need — both in your garden to grow...

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… Everything I’ve described here we’ve done without government assistance. Our hamlet is a self-initiated, self-supported urban homestead that we’d love to see replicated all over the country. The feature that makes this hamlet concept so attractive is that it can be imitated in any urban setting by neighbors building bonds with one another, collaboratively growing food in neighborhood gardens, making optimal use of their local resources, and lightening their footprint on our overstrained ecosystem. And gardening, I can tell...

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by Linda Gilkeson, Mother Earth News, February, 2014 Whether you grow food on a spacious homestead or are digging into your first urban garden, ditching the plant-by-rows approach and instead adopting intensive gardening techniques can help you grow a more productive garden that’s also more efficient to manage. These methods will open up a new world when it comes to small-space gardening, which can be so much more than just a few lone pots on a balcony. If you do...

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Guest post by Hazel Nicholls, Project Coordinator in SD&G for Growing Up Organic You may already know that school gardens are wonderful teaching tools, providing an ideal space for teachers to engage students in hands-on learning across disciplines. Gardens are known to increase physical activity, healthy eating habits, and positively impact student achievement and behaviour. Impressive benefits to be sure! But, did you know that a school gardens can also serve as a tool for building resilient communities? Consider these...

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by Daphne Miller M.D., reposted from YES! Magazine, Dec 6, 2013 I spend my days in a sterile 8×10 room practicing family medicine and yet my mind is in the soil. This is because I’m discovering just how much this rich, dark substance influences the day-to-day health of my patients. I’m even beginning to wonder whether Hippocrates was wrong, or at least somewhat misguided, when he proclaimed, “Let food be thy medicine.” Don’t get me wrong—food is important to our...

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