Posts filed under ‘Gardens’

What Can We Do?

Tapajós River in the Amazon © Todd Southgate / Greenpeace

At the University of Minnesota Dr. Nate Hagens teaches an honours course called “Reality 101: A Survey of the Human Predicament.” Hagens operated his own hedge fund on Wall Street until he glimpsed, “a serious disconnect between capitalism, growth, and the natural world. Money did not appear to bring wealthy clients more well being.

”Reality 101 addresses humanity’s toughest challenges: economic decline, inequality, pollution, biodiversity loss, and war. Students learn about systems ecology, neuroscience, and economics. “We ask hard questions,” says Hagens. “What is wealth? What are the limits to growth? We attempt to face our crises head on.”

Some students feel inspired to action, and some report finding the material “depressing.” One student shared the course material with a family member, who asked, “So what can I do?” The student struggled to answer this question, and the listener chastised her: “why did you explain all this to me, if you can’t tell me what to do?!”

A fair question. One that, as environmentalists, we often get asked. At the request of Dr Hagens, here is my list: Read What Can We Do? by Rex Weyler at Greenpeace.

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December 19, 2018 at 12:29 pm Leave a comment

Free Summer Pickings in Cornwall!

It is the middle of summer and there are free pickings to be had in Cornwall.   The gardens planted by Transition Cornwall+ Food Action Group along with families in the community at the Fire Station, in front of the Justice Building and along Montreal Road by the Police Station are full of healthy vegetables and herbs ready for anyone to harvest.  There is everything from tomatoes, to fresh green beans, chard and kale as well as basil, thyme, dill, chives and much more.

Read Free Summer Pickings in Cornwall! by Penny Bateman, TC+ Food Action Group

August 6, 2018 at 10:19 am Leave a comment

Seed Saving 101: 10 Things to Know If You Want to Start Saving Seeds

Image result for home seed saving

Beans. That’s right. If you want to start saving seeds, we recommend beans. Or peas. Why? Legumes are by far the easiest seeds to save, and among the easiest to germinate. You can’t go wrong. With that, let’s learn more about the basics of seed saving.

In order for a plant like lettuce to produce seed, you must wait for it to send up its gangly flower stalks, which eventually produce tiny seed pods. By this time. the lettuce leaves are becoming yellow, shriveled, and bitter. It’s the same with most crops—you don’t get to eat it and save the seed; it’s either one or the other. The good news is that a single plant produces many seeds. So you usually need to grow only a few extra for seed-saving purposes.

Read Seed Saving 101: 10 Things to Know If You Want to Start Saving Seeds by Modern Farmer.

July 23, 2018 at 10:57 am Leave a comment

5 Tips For a Bountiful, Water-Saving Vegetable Garden in a Time of Drought

Many are wondering whether there is room for a vegetable garden in a drier future. Some are looking at ways to conserve water, and others are looking at vegetable varieties that have adapted to growing in hot and dry conditions.

Below are some suggestions for vegetable gardening in times of drought that I’ve gleaned from research and these conversations.

Read 5 Tips For a Bountiful, Water-Saving Vegetable Garden in a Time of Drought by Ramon Gonzales at Treehugger.

July 9, 2018 at 10:37 am Leave a comment

Garden Plan For Pollinators

Many pollinator species have suffered serious declines in recent years. Unfortunately, most of our landscapes offer little in the way of appropriate habitat, forage, and housing. Even the most beautiful gardens are not always healthy ecosystems. Design choices, plant selections, and maintenance practices can make a huge difference in creating your own healthy ecosystem, filled with life. As a garden designer, I use this landscape plan for many gardens to attract the greatest varieties of pollinators.

A pollinator garden can be beautiful as well as useful. Strategies such as planting in groups of at least 3 to 5 plants is very important. A single plant won’t attract pollinators, but groups of same plants stand out and pollinators use less energy flying to a compact group of flowers.

Read Garden Plan For Pollinators by Claire Jones at Mother Earth News.

May 30, 2018 at 10:23 am Leave a comment

Transition Cornwall+ plans to get us more active and in the planting mood

The summer months almost here, Transition Cornwall+ made two different presentations to council on Monday about its plans for the warm weather this year.

The group’s biggest initiative will be the Walk and Roll campaign to get people to cut back on driving in favour of human-powered forms of transportation such as walking, cycling or skateboarding, or using public transit. This year’s campaign will expanded from being just week-long to running through the entire month of June.

The second annual initiative Cornwall Transition+ is working on is the Incredible Edible Plant Festival which will be returning in front of the Justice Building on Pitt Street on May 26 from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

“This will be our sixth Incredible Edible event and we are very, very proud of that,” said Bill Carriere, event organizer.

Read Transition Cornwall+ plans to get us more active and in the planting mood by Alan S. Hale at the Cornwall Standard-Freeholder.

May 16, 2018 at 10:34 am Leave a comment

Incredible Edible: Yorkshire town’s food-growing scheme takes root worldwide

When two women began turning disused verges in the former mill town of Todmorden into free food plots, little did they realise they would inspire a global movement of growers.

It’s a simple idea: take over unused or unattractive bits of public land to plant food to feed the community. What is not so simple is where they’re doing it. Todmorden is an old mill town in Yorkshire’s Calderdale valley. It rains a lot, there’s not a lot of sun, and it has experienced major flooding in recent years. But still, the town’s residents continue to grow fruit and vegetables as best they can for locals to pick and eat.

The Toddies didn’t set out to start a food-growing revolution, they wanted to bring their small town together at a difficult time for communities throughout the UK. “Ten years ago it was the beginning of the worldwide economic decline, there was a lot of worry about climate change, but nothing was really happening,” says Mary Clear, chair of IET. “And in this town we were starting to see the squeeze on public services – there was more litter – and we thought, how can we do something that will create stronger communities?”

Read Incredible Edible: Yorkshire town’s food-growing scheme takes root worldwide by Naomi Larsson at The Guardian.

May 9, 2018 at 10:37 am Leave a comment

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