Posts filed under ‘Gardens’

Cornwall Public Library wants to raise $250K for rooftop oasis

Dawn Kiddell and volunteer Anne Downing

The Cornwall Public Library could have a “roof oasis” by 2020.

Maybe sooner.

“If we have a good, solid fundraising strategy and the support we need, it could (be completed before 2020),” said Francois Marineau, chair of the Library Roofop Development Committee, at a Tuesday night stakeholder meeting.

The proposed $250,000 project would have the roof at the library on Second Street transformed into a gathering place, what Marineau called “an oasis in downtown Cornwall, a unique and attractive public venue that fosters learning, socialization and relaxation.”

The project, still considered to be in its early stages, would have the roof including a wellness area with quiet times for reading and reflection, and there could be activities including everything from yoga and Tai Chi to a night sky observatory. There could be music events, a green space café, a giant chessboard out of patio stones, community gardening and private social events, too.

Read Cornwall Public Library wants to raise $250K for rooftop oasis by Todd Hambleton at the Cornwall Standard-Freeholder.

June 12, 2017 at 10:23 am Leave a comment

The Easiest Way To Compost

Compost

So you’re ready to take the plunge and start composting. You’ve made the space, and put aside time to figure it out: this is the year. Two deep breaths. Now, how do you do it? Don’t worry! We’ve got you covered.
Here’s What You Need

1. Carbon-rich “brown” materials, such as fall leaves, straw, dead flowers from your garden, and shredded newspaper.

2. Nitrogen-rich “green” materials, such as grass clippings, plant-based kitchen waste (vegetable peelings and fruit rinds, but no meat scraps), or barnyard animal manure (even though its color is usually brown, manure is full of nitrogen like the other “green” stuff). Do not use manure from carnivores, such as cats or dogs.

3. A shovelful or two of garden soil.

4. A site that’s at least 3 feet long by 3 feet wide.

Read The Easiest Way To Compost at Rodale’s Organic Life.

 

June 5, 2017 at 11:09 am Leave a comment

Edible plant fest keeps growing

Experienced and aspiring green thumbs were at the promenade next to city hall on Saturday, to ask questions, learn, have fun, and even take home a plant to care for.
It was the Incredible Edible Plants Festival, hosted by the food action group of Transition Cornwall+ with the support of the All Things Food food network.
The event attracted a steady stream of a few hundred people to browse the booths and activities. MPP Jim Macdonell even arrived to present the organizers with a certificate for bringing the event back for a fifth year.
Organizer Kat Rendek said she was very pleased to see how the event has grown since its humble beginnings.
“The festival has grown considerably through partnerships in the community. Initially, in our first year, it was really just about the plant giveaway,” reflected Rendek.

”But now we have a community garden planting in four different community gardens . . . we also had a huge number of activities this year.”

Read Edible plant fest keeps growing by Alan S. Hale at the Cornwall Standard-Freeholder.

May 29, 2017 at 10:59 am Leave a comment

17 Vegetables for a Shady Garden

A shady yard doesn’t have to dash your vegetable gardening dreams. There are actually a number of vegetables that will do quite well with just a few hours of sun each day. Though these partial-sun plants may not produce the bountiful harvests that they would in full sun, they will still do quite well.

Most vegetables love the sun, and require a full day of good light to flourish.

 However, if you have a spot in the yard that gets just 4-6 hours of sun each day, you can still have a great little veggie garden. Here are some plants that should thrive.
  • Asparagus: It will take two to three years before your asparagus starts to produce, but it’s definitely worth the wait. Choose a good patch where it can run and grow, and you will be greeted with fresh stalks each spring. Asparagus plants can produce for up to 20 years!
  • Beans: Try beans that grow in a bush, rather than pole beans. These tend to do much better in the shade, and will grow quickly.

Read 17 Vegetables for a Shady Garden by Erin Huffstetler at The Balance.

May 24, 2017 at 11:31 am Leave a comment

From CSAs to containers at Hoople Creek Farms near Ingleside

There really is no excuse to not having fresh vegetables on your table each meal.

Hoople Creek Organic Farms is making it easier to make sure your family gets fresh vegetables by offering up another new in initiative, container gardens.

Hoople Creek owner Jamie Creskey said they have been operating the farm for 10 years now and hopes this new initiative will reach even more local residents interested in having fresh, organic vegetables on their tables.

“The idea is to allow more people to be able to grow organic produce and have it all season long,” said Creskey.

“Not everybody has the time, or wants to have as much as we produce for our CSA customers,” he said. “And we have been trialing hundreds of different vegetables to find the best ones to grow organically in our region. So we are making those plants available now through our container gardens.”

Read From CSAs to containers at Hoople Creek Farms near Ingleside by Lois Ann Baker at The Standard-Freeholder.

May 10, 2017 at 10:02 am Leave a comment

Lead in Urban Soil

raised-beds-square-jpgLearn about safe levels of lead in soil, testing soil for lead, lead remediation, and how to take a few simple precautions to take when gardening in urban soil.

Green, growing plants and vibrant flowers drastically improve upon broken concrete, crumbling brick, rusted chain-link, and shattered glass. However, there are different challenges to gardening in the city, and one of the biggest issues for urban gardeners is lead in soils.

Although adults can be affected by lead, children, especially those under 6, are at the highest risk of serious lead poisoning. Minor symptoms of lead poisoning will go away over time if the lead source is removed, but severe damage is permanent. There is no known safe threshold of lead in the blood for children; any lead at all in the body is a concern.

What Are Safe Levels of Lead in Soil?

What does this have to do with urban gardening? Lead contaminates many city soils. All soil contains a small amount of lead, measured in parts per million (ppm). Normal soils can contain 10 to 50 ppm of lead. Many governments and researchers have established guidelines for lead in soil.

Read Lead in Urban Soil by Andrew Weidman at The Heirloom Gardener.

April 26, 2017 at 11:02 am Leave a comment

Cornwall’s Seedy Saturday: Idea has grown

It’s an idea that goes back a couple of years, got nurtured and grew, and has now expanded to the Benson Centre.
It was “Seedy Saturday,’’ the third annual version, presented by Transition Cornwall+ Food Action Group, and All Things Food.
The event brought together a variety of seed vendors, local food vendors, beginner and advanced gardening workshops, free children’s activities and locally made refreshments, all under one roof.
“It’s an excellent chance for gardeners of all levels to purchase seeds and meet other growers in the community,’’ said Kat Rendek, All Things Food Community Network Co-ordinator.

Bill Carriere, with Transition Cornwall+ Food Action Group, agreed that the event was attracting a diverse crowd.“We’re seeing a real combination of people who came here (for Seedy Saturday) and people here for sports,’’ Carriere said. “It’s wonderful. We’re picking up a group of people who are not specifically coming for this.’’

Rendek and Carriere agreed that possibly over 1,000 people attended the event over the course of the day.

Read Cornwall’s Seedy Saturday: Idea has grown by Todd Hambleton at The Standard-Freeholder.

March 20, 2017 at 11:26 am Leave a comment

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