Posts filed under ‘Food’

From CSAs to containers at Hoople Creek Farms near Ingleside

There really is no excuse to not having fresh vegetables on your table each meal.

Hoople Creek Organic Farms is making it easier to make sure your family gets fresh vegetables by offering up another new in initiative, container gardens.

Hoople Creek owner Jamie Creskey said they have been operating the farm for 10 years now and hopes this new initiative will reach even more local residents interested in having fresh, organic vegetables on their tables.

“The idea is to allow more people to be able to grow organic produce and have it all season long,” said Creskey.

“Not everybody has the time, or wants to have as much as we produce for our CSA customers,” he said. “And we have been trialing hundreds of different vegetables to find the best ones to grow organically in our region. So we are making those plants available now through our container gardens.”

Read From CSAs to containers at Hoople Creek Farms near Ingleside by Lois Ann Baker at The Standard-Freeholder.

May 10, 2017 at 10:02 am Leave a comment

Lead in Urban Soil

raised-beds-square-jpgLearn about safe levels of lead in soil, testing soil for lead, lead remediation, and how to take a few simple precautions to take when gardening in urban soil.

Green, growing plants and vibrant flowers drastically improve upon broken concrete, crumbling brick, rusted chain-link, and shattered glass. However, there are different challenges to gardening in the city, and one of the biggest issues for urban gardeners is lead in soils.

Although adults can be affected by lead, children, especially those under 6, are at the highest risk of serious lead poisoning. Minor symptoms of lead poisoning will go away over time if the lead source is removed, but severe damage is permanent. There is no known safe threshold of lead in the blood for children; any lead at all in the body is a concern.

What Are Safe Levels of Lead in Soil?

What does this have to do with urban gardening? Lead contaminates many city soils. All soil contains a small amount of lead, measured in parts per million (ppm). Normal soils can contain 10 to 50 ppm of lead. Many governments and researchers have established guidelines for lead in soil.

Read Lead in Urban Soil by Andrew Weidman at The Heirloom Gardener.

April 26, 2017 at 11:02 am Leave a comment

Which diet makes best use of farmland? You might be surprised.

Land needed to support different diets

Vegetarian? Omnivore? Vegan? What should we eat if we want to feed a growing population while minimizing the need to farm more land? We know that meat-based meals require more farmland than plant-based ones. But which diet is the best fit for the mix of croplands and grazing land that supports agriculture today? That’s a different question with a potentially different answer, since much of the land we use to produce our food is better suited for grazing livestock than growing crops.

Since production of different types of food requires different types of agricultural land, researchers distinguished among three distinct categories of land: grazing land, cultivated cropland and perennial forage cropland.

A new study published in Elementa explores this perplexing question of the “foodprint” of different diets.

Read Which diet makes best use of farmland? You might be surprised. by Kristen Satre Meyer at Ensia.

April 19, 2017 at 10:57 am Leave a comment

‘First in Canada’ supermarket donation plan aids food banks and tackles waste

Supermarkets in Quebec will now be able to donate their unsold produce, meat and baked goods to local food banks in a program – described as the first of its kind in Canada – that also aims to keep millions of kilograms of fresh food out of landfills.

The Supermarket Recovery Program launched in 2013 as a two-year pilot project. Developed by the Montreal-based food bank Moisson Montréal, the goal was to tackle the twin issues of rising food bank usage in the province and the staggering amount of edible food being regularly sent to landfills.

Provincial officials said the pilot – which last year saw 177 supermarkets donate more than 2.5m kg of food that would have otherwise been discarded – would now begin expanding across the province.

“Hats off to this brilliant initiative which – besides being good for the environment – offers a unique and lasting solution to the problems of waste and food precariousness,” said Lucie Charlebois, the province’s minister of public health.

Read ‘First in Canada’ supermarket donation plan aids food banks and tackles waste by Ashifa Kassam at The Guardian.

March 22, 2017 at 10:23 am Leave a comment

Cornwall’s Seedy Saturday: Idea has grown

It’s an idea that goes back a couple of years, got nurtured and grew, and has now expanded to the Benson Centre.
It was “Seedy Saturday,’’ the third annual version, presented by Transition Cornwall+ Food Action Group, and All Things Food.
The event brought together a variety of seed vendors, local food vendors, beginner and advanced gardening workshops, free children’s activities and locally made refreshments, all under one roof.
“It’s an excellent chance for gardeners of all levels to purchase seeds and meet other growers in the community,’’ said Kat Rendek, All Things Food Community Network Co-ordinator.

Bill Carriere, with Transition Cornwall+ Food Action Group, agreed that the event was attracting a diverse crowd.“We’re seeing a real combination of people who came here (for Seedy Saturday) and people here for sports,’’ Carriere said. “It’s wonderful. We’re picking up a group of people who are not specifically coming for this.’’

Rendek and Carriere agreed that possibly over 1,000 people attended the event over the course of the day.

Read Cornwall’s Seedy Saturday: Idea has grown by Todd Hambleton at The Standard-Freeholder.

March 20, 2017 at 11:26 am Leave a comment

How to Share a Vegetable Garden

 Yard-sharing has many benefits, from access to fresh food to stronger neighborhood connections to environmental sustainability. But there are also potential pitfalls to sharing a garden, which you can avoid by discussing them early on with your neighbor.
Share Expectations
The first step is to discuss your expectations — this will prevent most potential conflicts or legal problems. You might start by talking through the following questions with your neighbor:
  • What will you grow? Who gets to eat the vegetables?
  • What should the garden look like and what will make it aesthetically pleasing?
  • During what hours may you come to work on the garden?
  • May you bring friends to work in the garden with you?
  • Who will care for the garden when you are away?

Read How to Share a Vegetable Garden by Janelle Orsi at Shareable.

March 13, 2017 at 10:43 am Leave a comment

Seed Starting: Easy Setups for Home Gardeners

seed-startingGrowing your own seedlings indoors can save you big bucks, as well as open up a whole new world of crop variety options. When you start seeds at home, you aren’t limited to the, well, “garden variety” plants available at most garden centers.

The range of setups you can use to start your seeds is nearly as diverse as the plants you can grow. We reached out to our readers to find out what seed-starting setups work well for them, and this is a roundup of their ideas. As you get set up at home, keep in mind that using lights will usually work better than placing plants on windowsills, and certain lights are superior for this purpose.

Read Seed Starting: Easy Setups for Home Gardeners  at Mother Earth News.

February 15, 2017 at 11:44 am Leave a comment

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