Posts filed under ‘Energy’

Provincial Party Responses 2018

Make your vote count: find out where the parties stand. The next Government of Ontario will inherit a province facing many significant environmental challenges, from climate change and ongoing loss of biodiversity to a steady build up of toxics and pollutants in our air, water and land.  Strong actions will be required to address these problems and to position Ontario to benefit in a world rapidly moving toward a low-carbon future and embracing the need for more sustainable economic and social systems. We asked all parties to describe their vision for making Ontario an environmental leader and how they will enhance the quality of life of all of its residents.

We have invited all four parties to submit any additional policies or information as the election progresses, and we will note when new information has been added.

Read Party Responses 2018 at Green Prosperity.

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June 4, 2018 at 10:37 am Leave a comment

RetroSuburbia talk by David Holmgren

Co-founder of the permaculture movement, David Holmgren, encourages permaculture activists to focus their energies on retrofitting suburbia for an energy descent future. David argues that the opportunities to retrofit are so much more important than new buildings because of the limits to debt based growth.

May 28, 2018 at 10:46 am Leave a comment

Rail lines, not pipelines: the past, present, and future of Canadian passenger rail

Graph of Canadian railway network, kilometres, historic, 1836 to 2016

One kilometre of oil pipeline contains the same amount of steel as two kilometres of railway track.* The proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion will, if it goes ahead, consume enough steel to build nearly 2,000 kms of new passenger rail track. The Keystone XL project would consume enough steel to build nearly 4,000 kms of track. And the now-cancelled Energy East pipeline would have required as much steel as 10,000 kms of track.

With these facts in mind, Canadians (and Americans) should consider our options and priorities. There’s tremendous pressure to build new pipelines. Building them, proponents claim, will result in jobs and economic development. But if we’re going to spend billions of dollars, lay down millions of tonnes of steel, and consume millions of person-hours of labour, should we be building soon-to-be-obsolete infrastructure to transport climate-destabilizing fossil fuels? Or should we take the opportunity to create even more jobs building a zero-emission twenty-first century transportation network for Canada and North America?

Read Rail lines, not pipelines: the past, present, and future of Canadian passenger rail by Darrin Qualman at Darrin Qualman blog.

May 21, 2018 at 11:05 am Leave a comment

Gas prices pinching your wallet? Here’s how much you could save with an electric car

Gas prices are expected to hit a four-year high in North America this summer, and things might get even worse now that the U.S. has pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal.

New sanctions on Iran, one of the world’s major oil producers, are already pushing up oil prices and could add another 5 cents a litre to the price of gasoline for Canadians this summer, GasBuddy analyst Dan Mcteague told Global News.

The prospect of pain at the pump through the summer driving season might spur more car-shopping Canadians to take a closer look at electric and hybrid vehicles.

There’s no question that battery-powered cars will save you a pretty penny when it comes to fuel costs.

Read Gas prices pinching your wallet? Here’s how much you could save with an electric car by Erica Alini at Global News.

May 14, 2018 at 10:51 am Leave a comment

Bank Funding of Fossil Fuels Soars

Banking on Climate Change 2018 is the ninth annual report that ranks bank policies and practices in funding fossil fuel production and extraction, including drilling for oil in tar sands, the Arctic and in deep water. The report examines 36 private banks from the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, Japan and China, and breaks down how much funding is going to different fossil fuel subsectors and companies.

This year’s numbers saw an 11 percent jump in funding, from $104 billion in 2016 to $115 billion in 2017, with the tar sands sector holding the biggest responsibility for the increase, along with continued financing in coal. In tar sands alone, bank lending and underwriting to tar sands oil extraction and pipeline projects grew by 111 percent from 2016 to 2017, reaching $98 billion. The three banks that contributed are the Royal Bank of Canada, TD Bank and JPMorgan Chase.

Read Bank Funding of Fossil Fuels Soars by Katherine Wei at Ecowatch.

 

April 2, 2018 at 11:01 am Leave a comment

Top 10 Energy Efficiency Tips for the Home

In this story, we look at both of the modest and extensive ways you can improve your home’s efficiency—small and big steps that can add up to big savings, and a significantly reduced carbon footprint.

To assemble our list of top ten actions you can take, we accompanied EnerGuide for homes auditor Jeff Paton as he conducted an EnerGuide assessment of Brian and Laura Finley’s 1956 home in Edmonton, Alberta. Then we pushed beyond the EnerGuide assessment and put together this list of the top 10 ways to improve the energy efficiency of your home.

Read Top 10 Energy Efficiency Tips for the Home by David Dodge and Scott Rollans at Green Energy Futures.

March 14, 2018 at 11:38 am Leave a comment

Ontario Investing in Energy Efficient Improvements for Social Housing

File:Ontario-wordmark.svgOntario is upgrading energy efficiency of social housing and improving living conditions for residents while fighting climate change through a new program from the Green Ontario Fund, a non-profit provincial agency funded by proceeds from the province’s cap on pollution and carbon market.

Chris Ballard, Minister of the Environment and Climate Change, was joined today by Peter Milczyn, Minister of Housing and Parminder Sandhu, Green Ontario Fund board chair, to announce the launch of the GreenON Social Housing program.

Along with existing provincial programs designed for larger social housing buildings, this new program will help improve the energy efficiency of social housing apartment buildings with fewer than 100 units across the province.

Improvements will include upgrades to energy-efficient heating and cooling systems, windows, lighting and insulation. These renovations will also improve the living conditions for low-income and vulnerable tenants and the long-term sustainability of buildings.

Read the full release: Ontario Investing in Energy Efficient Improvements for Social Housing

February 12, 2018 at 11:50 am Leave a comment

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