Posts filed under ‘Community’

10 Ways Bicycle-Friendly Streets Are Good for People Who Don’t Ride Bicycles

A dedicated bicycle lane in Durham, New Hampshire

Drivers, some of whom view the nation’s roadways as their exclusive domain, are having to contend with growing numbers of bicyclists and pedestrians.

Bicyclists, who are largely focused on maneuvering through vehicle traffic and not getting sideswiped on shoulderless streets, sometimes don’t realize how they imperil pedestrians.

People traveling by foot often feel under siege from both speeding cars and unpredictable bicycles.

Like many street-level conflicts, this one is about territory. Who owns the streets?

The solution (and key to reducing frustration and preventing actual injury) is to share the streets by providing a space for each group. Recent research shows that bicycle-friendly projects are even good for people who will never ride a bike. Here’s how:

Read 10 Ways Bicycle-Friendly Streets Are Good for People Who Don’t Ride Bicycles by Jay Walljasper at AARP.

May 15, 2017 at 10:56 am Leave a comment

How to Throw a Successful Yard Sale

By gosh, there’s nothing better than a good sale. And I’m not talking about shopping. Selling off your stuff can be surprisingly fun, liberating, and profitable. It’s hard work, though. To ensure good profits, your best bet is to organize a multi-family or neighborhood sale. Bigger sales bring more customers; a well-run, well-publicized event can net hundreds, if not thousands of dollars.

So how do you do it? Well, you’ll need more than a newspaper ad. Get organized, plan ahead, and use social media to make your sale stand out.

1. Start early and in person.
A month or two before the sale date, start calling your neighbors and friends. Hold a planning meeting, potluck-style. Topics of conversation: location, date, theme, and price points. Make an action plan and let every household choose a manageable task.

2. Create a web presence.
This step makes all the difference, but it doesn’t need to be complicated! The easiest method is to create a Facebook event. It’s quick to set up, and you can invite most of your friends and neighbors.

3. Catalogue the goods.
Create an online photo album (e.g. on Flickr). Use a shared login so your co-sellers can upload photos. Ask everyone to post their interesting or valuable items, along with information about any antiques or collectibles. If possible, set up a separate album for each participating household.

Read all 8 tips at How to Throw a Successful Yard Sale by Jessica Reeder at Shareable.

April 24, 2017 at 11:07 am Leave a comment

Hearts & Minds: Sharing as a Mental Health Intervention

green leaf breaking through crack in concrete

One of the biggest challenges for many societies in the 21st century is mental health. In addition to the incalculable human cost of pain, distress and heartbreak, it has also become a huge economic cost.

The World Economic Forum report ‘The Global Economic Burden of Non-communicable Diseases’ revealed that mental health issues are the single largest source of health care costs, more than cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, cancer, or diabetes.

At the same time that demand for services is increasing, austerity measures are exerting downward pressure on budgets. Communities everywhere will need creative ways to address mental health, and the associated spiralling costs.

Sharing and collaboration opens up incredible opportunities for strengthening individual and community resilience. Those participating in or monitoring sharing activity know this, usually anecdotally. But what if we could measure the benefits to people and societies?

Read Hearts & Minds: Sharing as a Mental Health Intervention by Sharon Ede at Post Growth.

April 12, 2017 at 10:48 am Leave a comment

StrongestTown Contest 2017 – Championship Round

We’ve invited our members, listeners and readers to nominate towns based on the Strong Towns strength test and Strong Towns principles. We know that no town is perfect. This contest is about showcasing towns that are doing their best to be strong, that have the building blocks in place to be strong towns today and in the future.

The votes are in and we’ve narrowed down our 16 town bracket to two final contestants: Guelph, Ontario and Traverse City, Michigan.

April 10, 2017 at 10:35 am Leave a comment

Building Community from Your Front Porch

“Hi, neighbor!” After work Michelle Colussi’s husband sits on the front steps, attracting visitors young and old. This bit of neighborliness encourages relationships which come in handy — like bailing out one another’s houses when the nearby creek flooded. Co-founder of Transition Victoria (BC), Michelle organized her neighbors to join in a five-week “Transition Street” initiative to discuss and improve household practices around conserving water, growing food, and reducing waste, energy and transport.

Resilient Streets Toolkit HERE>>

 

April 3, 2017 at 10:27 am Leave a comment

Cornwall’s Seedy Saturday: Idea has grown

It’s an idea that goes back a couple of years, got nurtured and grew, and has now expanded to the Benson Centre.
It was “Seedy Saturday,’’ the third annual version, presented by Transition Cornwall+ Food Action Group, and All Things Food.
The event brought together a variety of seed vendors, local food vendors, beginner and advanced gardening workshops, free children’s activities and locally made refreshments, all under one roof.
“It’s an excellent chance for gardeners of all levels to purchase seeds and meet other growers in the community,’’ said Kat Rendek, All Things Food Community Network Co-ordinator.

Bill Carriere, with Transition Cornwall+ Food Action Group, agreed that the event was attracting a diverse crowd.“We’re seeing a real combination of people who came here (for Seedy Saturday) and people here for sports,’’ Carriere said. “It’s wonderful. We’re picking up a group of people who are not specifically coming for this.’’

Rendek and Carriere agreed that possibly over 1,000 people attended the event over the course of the day.

Read Cornwall’s Seedy Saturday: Idea has grown by Todd Hambleton at The Standard-Freeholder.

March 20, 2017 at 11:26 am Leave a comment

How to Share a Vegetable Garden

 Yard-sharing has many benefits, from access to fresh food to stronger neighborhood connections to environmental sustainability. But there are also potential pitfalls to sharing a garden, which you can avoid by discussing them early on with your neighbor.
Share Expectations
The first step is to discuss your expectations — this will prevent most potential conflicts or legal problems. You might start by talking through the following questions with your neighbor:
  • What will you grow? Who gets to eat the vegetables?
  • What should the garden look like and what will make it aesthetically pleasing?
  • During what hours may you come to work on the garden?
  • May you bring friends to work in the garden with you?
  • Who will care for the garden when you are away?

Read How to Share a Vegetable Garden by Janelle Orsi at Shareable.

March 13, 2017 at 10:43 am Leave a comment

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