Posts filed under ‘Community’

Edible-garden strategy planted by Cornwall city council

Coun. Carilyne Hebert successfully got city council to begin laying the groundwork for an edible landscape strategy for Cornwall during its meeting on March 26.

Getting the city to start planting and harvesting edible plants in its various public gardens, flower beds and green spaces has been Hebert’s pet issue on council for the past couple of months. The councillor appears to be angling to make the creation of an edible planting strategy for Cornwall the legacy of her time on council, as she is apparently not sure if she will run for re-election.

Read Edible-garden strategy planted by Cornwall city council by Alan S. Hale at the Cornwall Standard-Freeholder.

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April 4, 2018 at 10:01 am Leave a comment

The town that’s found a potent cure for illness – community

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It could, if the results stand up, be one of the most dramatic medical breakthroughs of recent decades. It could transform treatment regimes, save lives, and save health services a fortune. Is it a drug? A device? A surgical procedure? No, it’s a newfangled intervention called community.

What this provisional data appears to show is that when isolated people who have health problems are supported by community groups and volunteers, the number of emergency admissions to hospital falls spectacularly.

Read The town that’s found a potent cure for illness – community by George Monbiot at The Guardian.

March 19, 2018 at 10:36 am Leave a comment

Be informed: Subscribe to your local newspaper

Have you given much thought to the newspapers, radio, and TV stations based right in your community? Local journalism is critical for democracy and the planet — and it’s dying. So subscribe to your hometown paper — or consider it as a gift for a friend or family member. Here’s why.

Watchdogs are awesome, but you’ve got to feed them. As important as the hometown shoe-leather might be, the little guys are hurting. Hundreds of newspapers have closed in the last 10 years. Why? Because papers make their money from print sales, and now we have a little thing called the internet. Nobody wants to pay for their news anymore. (This is a much-simplified version of what’s killing local news, of course. Here’s a deeper analysis.)

Read Be informed: Subscribe to your local newspaper by Ask Umbra at Grist.

February 5, 2018 at 11:54 am Leave a comment

Re-Imagine the Future

We hope the film Re-imagine the Future provoked your interest in exploring its themes more deeply. The quest to build attractive, functional alternatives to the world ordained by neoliberal economics is, in fact, growing. A kaleidoscope of innovations around the world is showing that the market and state are not the only players. A burgeoning Commons Sector is emerging and starting to flourish.

This WEBPAGE is a portal into the growing world of system-change activism, experimentation, legal and policy innovation, academic research and political analysis. Consider these links an invitation to enter into this world yourself. After all, the answers are not going to come from somewhere else; they have to start with us, personally and locally, and expand outward. We need to re-imagine the future.

 

November 13, 2017 at 12:03 pm Leave a comment

Exploring Canada’s Biosphere Reserves

UNESCO Biosphere Reserves are a way to think about nature that includes people as part of the environment. For those living in Canada’s Biosphere Reserves, the environment is only healthy if human communities and the ecosystems that sustain them are both thriving – today, and for hundreds of years to come. Narrated by Blue Rodeo’s Jim Cuddy, Striking Balance is an 8×50 minute documentary TV series that goes coast to coast in cinematic 4K – combining aerial, motion capture time-lapse, and nature photography to create a stunning picture of Canada’s Biosphere Reserves. Broadcasts start Oct. 4th @ 9pm on TVO, and will be available across Canada on TVO.org following broadcast. Knowledge Network broadcast will be in the spring of 2017.

September 27, 2017 at 11:21 am Leave a comment

How to Start a Crop Swap

Backyard gardeners and urban homesteaders are coming together to share excess produce in increasingly popular local meet-ups known as crop swaps, where neighbors exchange, say, beets and greens for apples and squash. Some crop swaps include trades for honey, eggs, flowers, and preserved or prepared foods, too.

Read How to Start a Crop Swap by Sarah Henry in Shareables.

August 16, 2017 at 10:49 am Leave a comment

Strength Test #1: How’s your Main Street doing?

“Take a photo of your main street at midday. Does the picture show more people than cars?”

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This is the first item on the Strength Test for a reason. It helps us understand on a very basic level whether your town is filled with cars passing through, or people enjoying your city center as a destination. At Strong Towns, we call humans the “indicator species of economic health.” If you’ve got a lot of them walking around, visiting your town’s businesses, enjoying your town’s amenities and living in your town’s homes, you’re well on your way to being a strong town. That means you have an economic base to support your community and people who genuinely want to live in your place and contribute to it.

On the other hand, if your main street is devoid of people and merely a thoroughfare for cars, that tells us about your town’s auto-dependence (which makes infrastructure costs expensive) and it tells us about the tax base of your community. In our analyses of tax value per acre in city after city, we find that downtown cores and main streets are the most economically productive places.

Read Strength Test #1: How’s your Main Street doing? by Rachel Quedno at Strong Towns.

June 26, 2017 at 10:59 am Leave a comment

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