Posts filed under ‘Carbon_Emissions’

Zeroing in on Emissions: Canada’s Clean Power Pathways – A Review

Report cover

This report undertakes an extensive review of global and Canadian decarbonization models and studies. It highlights ten technically feasible strategies, actions and considerations that a wide range of experts agree will be front and centre in any effective effort to zero out Canada’s emissions by the middle of this century, as science on climate change says is required.

Read: Zeroing in on Emissions: Canada’s Clean Power Pathways – A Review by Tom Green at the David Suzuki Foundation.

Advertisements

June 4, 2019 at 12:35 pm Leave a comment

14 leading national environmental organizations release platform expectations for the federal election

Today, Canada’s leading environmental organizations released a set of 20 federal party platform recommendations that address the climate, biodiversity, toxics and waste crises harming our country.

These recommendations represent the collective priorities of the 14 organizations and reflect a comprehensive set of solutions to today’s most urgent environmental challenges. These platform priorities are currently being discussed with each of the five main federal political parties to help them develop their own set of committed actions.

In late summer 2019, the organizations will release a non-partisan, comparative evaluation of the environmental platforms of all the parties, to help Canadians make informed voting decisions.

The 20 federal party platform recommendations can be found here.

May 9, 2019 at 8:50 pm Leave a comment

Four things Kingston can teach other cities about climate-change plans

Kingston city hall and surrounds

The municipality that has billed itself as “Canada’s most sustainable city since 2009 now has some solid evidence to back up the claim.

The November issue of the journal Climatic Change contains a ranking of the climate-change plans of 63 Canadian municipalities — and Kingston comes out on top.

Plans were evaluated based on eight criteria, including how a community sets its climate goals, how effective those goals are, and how it measures and achieves progress.

Municipalities are the “most vulnerable” of all levels of government when it comes to climate change, explains lead author Dave Guyadeen, of the University of Guelph, because they face the most immediate impacts. ”So we wanted to know how they are responding to it,” he says.

So what lessons can Kingston offer other municipalities trying to come up with or improve climate-change plans?

Read Four things Kingston can teach other cities about climate-change plans at TVO by David Rockne Corrigan.

March 18, 2019 at 10:57 am Leave a comment

What Can We Do?

Tapajós River in the Amazon © Todd Southgate / Greenpeace

At the University of Minnesota Dr. Nate Hagens teaches an honours course called “Reality 101: A Survey of the Human Predicament.” Hagens operated his own hedge fund on Wall Street until he glimpsed, “a serious disconnect between capitalism, growth, and the natural world. Money did not appear to bring wealthy clients more well being.

”Reality 101 addresses humanity’s toughest challenges: economic decline, inequality, pollution, biodiversity loss, and war. Students learn about systems ecology, neuroscience, and economics. “We ask hard questions,” says Hagens. “What is wealth? What are the limits to growth? We attempt to face our crises head on.”

Some students feel inspired to action, and some report finding the material “depressing.” One student shared the course material with a family member, who asked, “So what can I do?” The student struggled to answer this question, and the listener chastised her: “why did you explain all this to me, if you can’t tell me what to do?!”

A fair question. One that, as environmentalists, we often get asked. At the request of Dr Hagens, here is my list: Read What Can We Do? by Rex Weyler at Greenpeace.

December 19, 2018 at 12:29 pm Leave a comment

It’s time to talk about We

While change at a local level has created practical pieces of a regenerative culture; what an initiative that has emerged from the Stockholm Resilience Centre called seeds of a Good Anthropocene. [https://goodanthropocenes.net/], we have failed to significantly and measurably move the big picture.

From my time working with Transition groups all around the world, I have seen these issues present in just about every Transition group. They lead me to ask whether we are working in the right way, or whether we are asking the right questions, or working in a way that will ultimately produce change, or whether the structure of the Industrial Growth System somehow prevents fundamental systemic change. Here are some of the main stumbling blocks.

Read It’s time to talk about We by Naresh Giangrande at The Transition Network.

November 5, 2018 at 11:46 am Leave a comment

Reducing Your Carbon Footprint Still Matters

We don’t recommend taking personal actions like limiting plane rides, eating less meat, or investing in solar energy because all of these small tweaks will build up to enough carbon savings (though it could help). We do so because people taking action in their personal lives is actually one of the best ways to get to a society that implements the policy-level change that is truly needed. Research on social behavior suggests lifestyle change can build momentum for systemic change. Humans are social animals, and we use social cues to recognize emergencies. People don’t spring into action just because they see smoke; they spring into action because they see others rushing in with water. The same principle applies to personal actions on climate change.

Read Reducing Your Carbon Footprint Still Matters by Leor Hackel and Gregg Sparkman at Slate.

October 29, 2018 at 10:38 am Leave a comment

4 big takeaways from the UN’s alarming climate change report

The new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change on limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, or 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit, is out. Its prognosis for the planet is grim: We may have as little as 12 years to act on climate change — to slash global emissions 45 percent — to reach this target.

The report was commissioned by the United Nations to see what would happen if global average temperatures rose by 1.5°C above preindustrial levels, and what it would take to cap warming at that level.

The new report is meant to build on that agreement, and it is exhaustive, with 132 authors, drawing on more than 6,000 peer-reviewed research articles. The overarching conclusion is that every fraction of a degree of warming matters. Letting temperatures rise will exact a huge toll on lives, natural systems, and the economy. Fighting to keep warming in check — which will include radically and rapidly reducing coal and oil consumption, among other things — will save lives, the food supply, and homes.

Read 4 big takeaways from the UN’s alarming climate change report by Umair Irfan at Vox.

October 10, 2018 at 10:42 am Leave a comment

Older Posts


Make a donation
Find local resources

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 189 other followers

Recent Posts

Transition Network

Recommended Reading

Transition Initiatives Primer

Archives


%d bloggers like this: