Posts filed under ‘Carbon_Emissions’

Climate change impacts on birds we love

What will climate change mean for the more than 45 million American birdwatchers? Much more importantly, what will it mean for the birds we most love and enjoy?

In Case You Missed It

With birds finely tuned to their living conditions – landscape, vegetation, weather, food, water – we know that a warming globe will add to the problems they already face.

The Audubon Society’s “Birds and Climate Report” website offers a useful overview. At the site’s core: its maps of changing climate ranges for 588 North American species, over half of them heading for trouble.

Read Climate change impacts on birds we love at Yale Climate Connections.

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June 18, 2018 at 11:00 am Leave a comment

How a warmer Arctic could intensify extreme weather

Is there a link between the vanishing Arctic sea ice and extreme weather?

Some prominent climate researchers think so. That’s because warming temperatures in the Arctic are altering the behavior of the polar jet stream, a high-altitude river of air that drives weather patterns across the globe. As the winds that propel the jet stream weaken, storms, droughts, and extreme heat and cold move over continents at slower rates, meaning bad weather can stick around for longer.

Eli Kintisch reports aboard the Norwegian research vessel Helmer Hanssen about how changing conditions at the top of the world could be impacting weather far away.

Read How a warmer Arctic could intensify extreme weather at Vox, by Eli Kintisch and Mallory Brangan.

April 18, 2018 at 11:03 am Leave a comment

Solving Climate Change — The Opportunity for Business with Katharine Wilkinson

Project Drawdown is the most comprehensive plan ever proposed to reverse global warming and reach the point in time when the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere begins to decline on a year-to-year basis. Hear from Project Drawdown on how its team of PhDs developed the plan, based on existing solutions and technologies, and how businesses can act on these opportunities now to put carbon back where it belongs

April 11, 2018 at 9:46 am Leave a comment

Bank Funding of Fossil Fuels Soars

Banking on Climate Change 2018 is the ninth annual report that ranks bank policies and practices in funding fossil fuel production and extraction, including drilling for oil in tar sands, the Arctic and in deep water. The report examines 36 private banks from the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, Japan and China, and breaks down how much funding is going to different fossil fuel subsectors and companies.

This year’s numbers saw an 11 percent jump in funding, from $104 billion in 2016 to $115 billion in 2017, with the tar sands sector holding the biggest responsibility for the increase, along with continued financing in coal. In tar sands alone, bank lending and underwriting to tar sands oil extraction and pipeline projects grew by 111 percent from 2016 to 2017, reaching $98 billion. The three banks that contributed are the Royal Bank of Canada, TD Bank and JPMorgan Chase.

Read Bank Funding of Fossil Fuels Soars by Katherine Wei at Ecowatch.

 

April 2, 2018 at 11:01 am Leave a comment

Ottawa among 13 cities that could see 2 C increase in 2020s: report

Ottawa is among 13 cities worldwide that are projected to see temperature hikes that could exceed 2 C over the next decade or so, according to a new report.

Cities that could see the steepest temperature increases during the 2020s include Helsinki in Finland (2.5 C), Ottawa (2.3 C) and Trondheim in Norway (2.3 C), the study showed.

The new data provides “foundation knowledge” for cities at the forefront of efforts to rein in the effects of global warming, said Cynthia Rosenzweig, an editor of the report and a researcher with NASA.

Read Ottawa among 13 cities that could see 2 C increase in 2020s: report at CBC  News.

March 12, 2018 at 10:52 am Leave a comment

A eureka moment for the planet: we’re finally planting trees again

Illustration by Mitch Blunt

After centuries of bad stewardship, communities are at last starting to see the benefits of forests. China plans to plant forests the size of Ireland. Latin American countries have pledged to restore 20m hectares of degraded forest and African countries more than 100m hectares. India is to plant 13m hectares, and on a single day last year 1.5 million people planted 66m trees in Madhya Pradesh alone.

This enthusiasm for a greener world, expressed in trees, is inspiring and overdue. For 200 years forested countries barely knew what to do with their trees. They were treated as expendable and a waste of space. But in a great cultural shift, they have changed from being dark and fearsome places to semi-sacred and untouchable.

And why not? In this new ecological age, we have learned that trees have far more value than providing timber: they keep soils moist, prevent floods and provide shelter, store carbon, beautify landscapes, protect water sources, increase biodiversity, improve conservation and induce human wellbeing.

Read A eureka moment for the planet: we’re finally planting trees again by John Vidal at The Guardian.

February 14, 2018 at 11:02 am Leave a comment

Ontario Investing in Energy Efficient Improvements for Social Housing

File:Ontario-wordmark.svgOntario is upgrading energy efficiency of social housing and improving living conditions for residents while fighting climate change through a new program from the Green Ontario Fund, a non-profit provincial agency funded by proceeds from the province’s cap on pollution and carbon market.

Chris Ballard, Minister of the Environment and Climate Change, was joined today by Peter Milczyn, Minister of Housing and Parminder Sandhu, Green Ontario Fund board chair, to announce the launch of the GreenON Social Housing program.

Along with existing provincial programs designed for larger social housing buildings, this new program will help improve the energy efficiency of social housing apartment buildings with fewer than 100 units across the province.

Improvements will include upgrades to energy-efficient heating and cooling systems, windows, lighting and insulation. These renovations will also improve the living conditions for low-income and vulnerable tenants and the long-term sustainability of buildings.

Read the full release: Ontario Investing in Energy Efficient Improvements for Social Housing

February 12, 2018 at 11:50 am Leave a comment

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