Posts filed under ‘Active Transportation’

Why and How to Shop by Bike

The benefits

1. You save money

I can fit only so much food on my bike when I shop so I buy only what I need. The limited space on my bike makes impulse buys—always processed and almost always packaged in plastic—very difficult unless I eat them on the spot at the store or while riding home, risking my life for chocolate.

2. You eat fresher food

When you shop by bike, because you can bring only so much home, you make a few trips every week rather than one trip every week or two. You have very fresh food on hand, it tastes better and you waste less of it because it has less time to turn before you can eat it. This takes a bit more time than major shopping just once every week or two does, however, on these frequent trips, I can zip in and out with my smaller purchases and often go in the 10-items-or-less aisle. And I’m working some exercise into my shopping too, which I need to do anyway (see #4).

Read Why and How to Shop by Bike at Zero Waste Chef.

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August 14, 2017 at 11:07 am Leave a comment

10 Ways Bicycle-Friendly Streets Are Good for People Who Don’t Ride Bicycles

A dedicated bicycle lane in Durham, New Hampshire

Drivers, some of whom view the nation’s roadways as their exclusive domain, are having to contend with growing numbers of bicyclists and pedestrians.

Bicyclists, who are largely focused on maneuvering through vehicle traffic and not getting sideswiped on shoulderless streets, sometimes don’t realize how they imperil pedestrians.

People traveling by foot often feel under siege from both speeding cars and unpredictable bicycles.

Like many street-level conflicts, this one is about territory. Who owns the streets?

The solution (and key to reducing frustration and preventing actual injury) is to share the streets by providing a space for each group. Recent research shows that bicycle-friendly projects are even good for people who will never ride a bike. Here’s how:

Read 10 Ways Bicycle-Friendly Streets Are Good for People Who Don’t Ride Bicycles by Jay Walljasper at AARP.

May 15, 2017 at 10:56 am Leave a comment

StrongestTown Contest 2017 – Championship Round

We’ve invited our members, listeners and readers to nominate towns based on the Strong Towns strength test and Strong Towns principles. We know that no town is perfect. This contest is about showcasing towns that are doing their best to be strong, that have the building blocks in place to be strong towns today and in the future.

The votes are in and we’ve narrowed down our 16 town bracket to two final contestants: Guelph, Ontario and Traverse City, Michigan.

April 10, 2017 at 10:35 am Leave a comment

How Much Does it Really Cost to Charge that Electric Vehicle?

fillupJust about every article or news piece about an electric car that we do – and there is a lot of EV news lately – gets a comment thread filled with people debating the price of charging an EV. “Hydro rates are so high”, “maybe when electricity is cheaper”, “who can afford to drive one when I can use cheaper gas”, and best of all “filling a tank with fuel is half the price of plugging in a car.”

What we realized is that buyers don’t seem to know just how much it costs to charge an EV. I realized that I didn’t know how much it would cost to charge an EV either. But I wanted to find out. We all know exactly how much it costs to put gas in the tank – look at the lines if there is a one cent jump expected tomorrow – but electricity is more stable and more predictable. So how much does it cost to “fill up” an electric car?

Read How Much Does it Really Cost to Charge that Electric Vehicle? by Evan Williams at Auto Trader.

March 8, 2017 at 12:42 pm Leave a comment

Ontario Making Electric Vehicles More Affordable

electricOntario is making it easier for people across the province to reduce greenhouse gas pollution and switch to an electric vehicle (EV) by further enhancing its Electric Vehicle Incentive Program (EVIP).

The Electric Vehicle Incentive Program (EVIP) supports the adoption of electric vehicles (EVs), rewards early adopters, and helps to create market demand for new technology in Ontario by providing incentives for the purchase and/or lease of eligible EVs.

Part of Ontario’s Climate Change Action Plan, and in effect as of Jan. 1, 2017, the updated EVIP:

  • Removes the cap limiting EV incentives to 30 per cent of the manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP)
  • Eliminates the $3,000 cap on incentives for EVs fully run on battery power and priced between $75,000 and $150,000, which enable long-range, zero-emission travel and have less environmental impact than lower priced plug-in hybrids
  • Continues to exclude EVs with an MSRP of $150,000 and above from qualifying for incentives
  • Offers incentives only on vehicles produced by automakers who are partners in Ontario’s new Electric and Hydrogen Vehicle Advancement Partnership (EHVAP).

Read the News Release HERE>>

February 8, 2017 at 11:36 am Leave a comment

Canada Can Make Huge Climate Gains by Cleaning Up Transportation Sector: Experts

emissionsCanada’s transportation emissions are mainly from vehicles on the road. Personal vehicles — cars and light trucks — account for half of all emissions in the sector and freight trucks are an additional 32 per cent. Aviation, rail, marine shipping and recreational vehicles make up the balance.

If we are serious about meeting our climate targets and we are committed to action to do so, decarbonizing our transportation is one effective way and electric vehicles provide an opportunity to do that,” Suzanne Goldberg, director of research at Simon Fraser University’s Sustainable Transportation Action Research Team (START), told DeSmog Canada.

The International Energy Agency estimates to avoid increasing the average global temperature by more than two degrees — the Paris Agreement target — sales of electric vehicles must exceed 40 per cent of all vehicle sales by 2040.

Goldberg and START analyzed federal and provincial policies that directly or indirectly affect electric vehicles sales in Canada and found no province will hit the agency’s proposed target.

Read Canada Can Make Huge Climate Gains by Cleaning Up Transportation Sector: Experts by Derek Leahy at desmogcanada.

January 4, 2017 at 11:18 am Leave a comment

Uptake In Cycling Benefits Local Economies

tdl327c

It’s well established that increases in cycling modal share create a multiplier effect in population health improvements and reduced health care costs. Yet the economic effects don’t seem to be as well accepted, despite quinquennial study updates in places like Québec, published by MTQ and Vélo Québec.  It’s good to see other studies from other regions add to that evidence.  Here, BBC Research reports on Colorado, where cycling events and tourism add $1.6 billion annually to the state economy. That’s why Bike Friendly Business Areas and paved shoulders are so important in the larger economic picture.

Read Uptake In Cycling Benefits Local Economies by Alan Metcalfe at Brockville Active Mobility Matters.

Hat tip to Transition Brockville for this link!

November 28, 2016 at 10:51 am Leave a comment

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