Posts filed under ‘Active Transportation’

The Safe Way to Ride Your Bike in Winter

Even for many dedicated bike commuters, cycling in the worst parts of winter can be a step too far. For those of us who approach any physical activity with mixed emotions, the sight of snow on the ground is a perfect excuse to find any other way to get around. But still, in cities where cycling is common, bike lanes stay busy even when the snow is piling up.

This isn’t just a Copenhagen quirk. While Amsterdam’s relatively temperate winters often only experience short bursts of snow and ice, cycling in freezing temperatures is common across Scandinavia, even in cities close to the arctic circle. If they can do it, surely there are ways you can prepare to bike through the next cold spat, right? To find some practical tips for safe winter cycling, CityLab turned to Anna Luten, the Global Development Director for the Bicycle Mayor Program. Here’s what she recommends:

Read The Safe Way to Ride Your Bike in Winter by Feagus O’Sullivan at City Lab.


February 26, 2018 at 11:36 am Leave a comment

Walk and Roll Cornwall SDG

Last summer the Transition Cornwall+ Active Transportation Group set out to interview a couple of people who love to walk and roll in Cornwall and SDG.  Their goal was to learn more about where they walk and roll, what tips and tricks they have to share with others and why they love doing it!

With the help of the Eastern Ontario Health Unit communication team, they were able to capture it all on tape and produce two short videos.  The participants – Nancy and the Garcia Family – were great sports!

Walk and Roll Cornwall-SDG is an online space to help people who live, work and play in Cornwall and the United Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry to get around safely either on foot, by bike or by transit.


November 8, 2017 at 11:38 am Leave a comment

Why and How to Shop by Bike

The benefits

1. You save money

I can fit only so much food on my bike when I shop so I buy only what I need. The limited space on my bike makes impulse buys—always processed and almost always packaged in plastic—very difficult unless I eat them on the spot at the store or while riding home, risking my life for chocolate.

2. You eat fresher food

When you shop by bike, because you can bring only so much home, you make a few trips every week rather than one trip every week or two. You have very fresh food on hand, it tastes better and you waste less of it because it has less time to turn before you can eat it. This takes a bit more time than major shopping just once every week or two does, however, on these frequent trips, I can zip in and out with my smaller purchases and often go in the 10-items-or-less aisle. And I’m working some exercise into my shopping too, which I need to do anyway (see #4).

Read Why and How to Shop by Bike at Zero Waste Chef.

August 14, 2017 at 11:07 am Leave a comment

10 Ways Bicycle-Friendly Streets Are Good for People Who Don’t Ride Bicycles

A dedicated bicycle lane in Durham, New Hampshire

Drivers, some of whom view the nation’s roadways as their exclusive domain, are having to contend with growing numbers of bicyclists and pedestrians.

Bicyclists, who are largely focused on maneuvering through vehicle traffic and not getting sideswiped on shoulderless streets, sometimes don’t realize how they imperil pedestrians.

People traveling by foot often feel under siege from both speeding cars and unpredictable bicycles.

Like many street-level conflicts, this one is about territory. Who owns the streets?

The solution (and key to reducing frustration and preventing actual injury) is to share the streets by providing a space for each group. Recent research shows that bicycle-friendly projects are even good for people who will never ride a bike. Here’s how:

Read 10 Ways Bicycle-Friendly Streets Are Good for People Who Don’t Ride Bicycles by Jay Walljasper at AARP.

May 15, 2017 at 10:56 am Leave a comment

StrongestTown Contest 2017 – Championship Round

We’ve invited our members, listeners and readers to nominate towns based on the Strong Towns strength test and Strong Towns principles. We know that no town is perfect. This contest is about showcasing towns that are doing their best to be strong, that have the building blocks in place to be strong towns today and in the future.

The votes are in and we’ve narrowed down our 16 town bracket to two final contestants: Guelph, Ontario and Traverse City, Michigan.

April 10, 2017 at 10:35 am Leave a comment

How Much Does it Really Cost to Charge that Electric Vehicle?

fillupJust about every article or news piece about an electric car that we do – and there is a lot of EV news lately – gets a comment thread filled with people debating the price of charging an EV. “Hydro rates are so high”, “maybe when electricity is cheaper”, “who can afford to drive one when I can use cheaper gas”, and best of all “filling a tank with fuel is half the price of plugging in a car.”

What we realized is that buyers don’t seem to know just how much it costs to charge an EV. I realized that I didn’t know how much it would cost to charge an EV either. But I wanted to find out. We all know exactly how much it costs to put gas in the tank – look at the lines if there is a one cent jump expected tomorrow – but electricity is more stable and more predictable. So how much does it cost to “fill up” an electric car?

Read How Much Does it Really Cost to Charge that Electric Vehicle? by Evan Williams at Auto Trader.

March 8, 2017 at 12:42 pm Leave a comment

Ontario Making Electric Vehicles More Affordable

electricOntario is making it easier for people across the province to reduce greenhouse gas pollution and switch to an electric vehicle (EV) by further enhancing its Electric Vehicle Incentive Program (EVIP).

The Electric Vehicle Incentive Program (EVIP) supports the adoption of electric vehicles (EVs), rewards early adopters, and helps to create market demand for new technology in Ontario by providing incentives for the purchase and/or lease of eligible EVs.

Part of Ontario’s Climate Change Action Plan, and in effect as of Jan. 1, 2017, the updated EVIP:

  • Removes the cap limiting EV incentives to 30 per cent of the manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP)
  • Eliminates the $3,000 cap on incentives for EVs fully run on battery power and priced between $75,000 and $150,000, which enable long-range, zero-emission travel and have less environmental impact than lower priced plug-in hybrids
  • Continues to exclude EVs with an MSRP of $150,000 and above from qualifying for incentives
  • Offers incentives only on vehicles produced by automakers who are partners in Ontario’s new Electric and Hydrogen Vehicle Advancement Partnership (EHVAP).

Read the News Release HERE>>

February 8, 2017 at 11:36 am Leave a comment

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