Stop the Leakage: How food-centered urban design solves economic challenges

February 19, 2018 at 12:20 pm Leave a comment

Stop the Leakage: How food-centered urban design solves economic challengesWhat happens when you eat the wrong food over and over again? We call it “leakage.” Leakage is when capital exits the economy rather than remaining in it. Our current food system as designed (or left un-designed) is a constant source of leakage for our cities and a missed opportunity for urban planners.

What if city designs included space for urban farming to provide a percentage of the calories required by their inhabitants? What if the community saw urban farming as an opportunity for economic growth and employment? What if the local government spent the same amount of money on the education, distribution, and land leasing to create food related jobs as it did on to attracting big businesses?

Let’s consider how much money could be kept in the local economy by creating our own urban food plan, giving local farmers the opportunity to supply the food sold at local grocery stores and restaurants.

Read Stop the Leakage: How food-centered urban design solves economic challenges by Nathan Pickard at Strong Towns.

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Entry filed under: Business, Food, Permaculture, Relocalization.

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