Ten Climate-Conscious Parents on Talking to Kids about Global Warming

March 1, 2017 at 11:05 am Leave a comment

walkingNobody wants to frighten their kids. (We know even the most reasonable adults are shut down by fear.) But as the stakes grow more stark and the politics get more divisive, it’s more crucial than ever that we bring the full force of our emotions to this fight and that we raise active, community-minded, and environmentally-aware citizens. And, I believe, talking to our kids is one way to focus all our own difficult and powerful feelings in a way that fuels rather than saps our civic and political engagement.

Think about it: dealing with climate change is about things kids already know well. It’s about cleaning up our messes; about the sun, wind, air, water, and our own bodies; it’s about treating all people with respect and dignity, about stopping bullies; about sharing; and also about making rules that keep us safe — and making sure everyone follows the same rules! Young people are naturally curious, observant, and creative — they can get excited about nature, science, and new ideas.

Read Ten Climate-Conscious Parents on Talking to Kids about Global Warming by Anna Fahey at The Tyee.

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Entry filed under: Climate, Heart/Soul, How-To, Students/Youth.

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