Household consumption significant driver of climate, other environmental impacts

March 2, 2016 at 10:49 am Leave a comment

Woman sitting on sofa surrounded with shopping bags, rubbing feetYou won’t make big cuts in your environmental impact by taking shorter showers or turning out the lights. The real environmental problem, a new analysis has shown, is embodied in the things you buy.

The world’s workshop — China — surpassed the United States as the largest emitter of greenhouse gases on Earth in 2007. But if you consider that nearly all of the products that China produces, from iPhones to tee-shirts, are exported to the rest of the world, the picture looks very different.

“If you look at China’s per capita consumption-based (environmental) footprint, it is small,” says Diana Ivanova, a PhD candidate at Norwegian University of Science and Technology’s Industrial Ecology Programme. “They produce a lot of products but they export them. It’s different if you put the responsibility for those impacts on the consumer, as opposed to the producer.”

Read Household consumption significant driver of climate, other environmental impacts by Nancy Bazilchuck at Gemini Science News.

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Entry filed under: Carbon_Emissions, Climate, Reducing Consumption.

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