Gabor Maté: How to Build a Culture of Good Health

December 9, 2015 at 11:05 am Leave a comment

healthPolicymakers and community leaders need to be taught that economic and social disparities, insecurities, and stresses, as well as racial or ethnic inequalities, inevitably result in health problems and vastly increased health costs. In truth, almost all diseases are social diseases.

On the societal level, we must understand that health is not an individual outcome, but arises from social cohesion, community ties, and mutual support. In this alienated culture, where “friends” may be virtual electronic entities rather than human beings, too many suffer from what University of Chicago psychologist John Cacioppo calls “the lethality of loneliness.” We need a broad attitudinal and practical shift, consciously willed and created, toward a culture based on the fundamental sociality of human beings. We know all too well, from data too persuasive and too somber to be disputed, that emotional isolation kills.

“A culture can be toxic or nourishing,” writes Thom Hartmann. If we wish to take full responsibility for health in our society, we must not only be vigilant guardians of our personal well-being, we must also work to change structures, institutions, and ideologies that keep us mired in a toxic culture.

Read Gabor Maté: How to Build a Culture of Good Health in Yes! Magazine.

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Community, Health/Wellness, Resilience, Social Justice.

The Science Of Why Scarcity Makes Us More Creative Handmade Market Craft Sale

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Make a donation
Find local resources

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 153 other followers

Recent Posts

Transition Network
Transition Initiatives Primer

Archives


%d bloggers like this: