Scientists have discovered that living near trees is good for your health

August 31, 2015 at 10:31 am 1 comment

treed streetIn a new paper published Thursday, a team of researchers present a compelling case for why urban neighborhoods filled with trees are better for your physical health. The research appeared in the open access journal Scientific Reports.

“Controlling for income, age and education, we found a significant independent effect of trees on the street on health,” said Marc Berman, a co-author of the study and also a psychologist at the University of Chicago. “It seemed like the effect was strongest for the public [trees]. Not to say the other trees don’t have an impact, but we found stronger effects for the trees on the street.”

Indeed, given the large size of the study, the researchers were able to compare the beneficial effect of trees in a neighborhood to other well-known demographic factors that are related to improved health, such as age and wealth. Thus, they found that “having 10 more trees in a city block, on average, improves health perception in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $10,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $10,000 higher median income or being 7 years younger.”

“I’d feel pretty confident to say to a municipality, increase the number of trees by 10″ per block, said Berman.

Read Scientists have discovered that living near trees is good for your health by Chris Mooney in the Washington Post.

 

 

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Biodiversity, Health/Wellness, Resilience.

Garlic Festival in Lamoureux Park Citi report: slowing global warming would save tens of trillions of dollars

1 Comment Add your own

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Make a donation
Find local resources

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 151 other followers

Recent Posts

Transition Network
Transition Initiatives Primer

Archives


%d bloggers like this: