Climate change study says most of Canada’s oil reserves should be left underground

January 14, 2015 at 11:05 am 1 comment

Most of the Earth’s fossil fuels will have to be left in the ground if the world is to avoid catastrophic global warming, according to a new study published in the scientific journal Nature.

And Canada’s oil patch would have to be left mostly unexploited if the world is to avoid a rise in average temperature of two degrees or more, as almost every country in the world has committed to do.

“All politicians worldwide have signed up to this idea of keeping temperature rise below two degrees,” said author Christopher McGlade. “One of the stark findings to come out of this study was how that is inconsistent with current views that every country wants to produce all of its own reserves and resources. So what we wanted to show was the disparity.”

McGlade and co-author Paul Elkins, both of University College London, calculated that the total amount of carbon stored in fossil fuel reserves that are known, technologically viable and likely to be extracted under current economic conditions is about three times what the planet’s atmosphere could be expected to absorb without breaking through the two-degree barrier.

Read the full article HERE on CBC News.

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Entry filed under: Carbon_Emissions, Climate.

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1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Dr. Erik T. Goluboff MD  |  February 26, 2015 at 10:01 am

    Dr. Erik T. Goluboff MD

    Climate change study says most of Canada’s oil reserves should be left underground | Transition Cornwall +

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