Learning How to Die in the Anthropocene

November 20, 2013 at 11:21 am Leave a comment

In the wake of the recent tornadoes in the States and the typhoon that hit the Philippines, this article provides a thoughtful meditation on the subject of our future.

The biggest problem climate change poses isn’t how the Department of Defense should plan for resource wars, or how we should put up sea walls to protect Alphabet City, or when we should evacuate Hoboken. It won’t be addressed by buying a Prius, signing a treaty, or turning off the air-conditioning. The biggest problem we face is a philosophical one: understanding that this civilization is already dead. The sooner we confront this problem, and the sooner we realize there’s nothing we can do to save ourselves, the sooner we can get down to the hard work of adapting, with mortal humility, to our new reality.

The choice is a clear one. We can continue acting as if tomorrow will be just like yesterday, growing less and less prepared for each new disaster as it comes, and more and more desperately invested in a life we can’t sustain. Or we can learn to see each day as the death of what came before, freeing ourselves to deal with whatever problems the present offers without attachment or fear.

Read the article by Roy Scranton here.

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Climate, Heart/Soul.

Promoting Locally Sourced Food November Events for the Inquiring Mind

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Make a donation
Find local resources

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 153 other followers

Recent Posts

Transition Network
Transition Initiatives Primer

Archives


%d bloggers like this: