TLTI thinking tiny (homes)

When it comes to new housing, the Township of Leeds and the Thousand Islands is thinking small.

Tiny, in fact.

Council members decided this week to embrace the tiny-house movement that has become the darling of environmental trend-setters in the United States and Europe.

They asked planning director Elaine Mallory to prepare a zoning bylaw amendment that would remove the minimum size requirements for new houses, and include tiny houses in the township’s definition of permissible dwellings.

The township’s building rules now say that new houses should be at least 807 square feet in size, although houses can go as small as 484 square feet in a mobile home park.

Tiny houses, on the other hand, can run as small as 223 square feet, plus a “wash closet” in the bachelor model.

Read TLTI thinking tiny (homes) by Wayne Lowrie at The Brockville Recorder and Times.

Hat tip to Transition Brockville for this post.

 

 

 

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October 18, 2017 at 10:57 am Leave a comment

Revitalized eco-system

Twenty years ago, the stretch of land between Lamoureux Park and the bridge to Cornwall Island was a brown wasteland where the natural ecosystem had been stripped away by industrial pollution.

Then, in 1997, the Raisin Region Conservation Authority with funding from the Cornwall Rotary Club put in the rushing creek that exists there today in an effort to restore the original ecosystem. This area would then became known as the Rotary Eco-Gardens.

Two decades later, on Sunday, Transition Cornwall+ Tree Action Arbre organized a guided tour of the eco-gardens with one of the scientists who originally spearheaded the project. Organizer Susan Towndrow said the walk was about admiring the handiwork of all the people who worked hard to revitalize the riverside ecosystem.

Read Revitalized eco-system by Alan S. Hale at the Cornwall Standard-Freeholder.

 

 

 

October 16, 2017 at 11:02 am Leave a comment

Maple Leaf Project

Saturday October 14, 9-12, Children’s Aid Society Boundary Road, Everyone is encouraged to participate in this Raisin Region Conservation Authority  project of planting over 150 trees in the shape of a maple leaf. Free barbecue. Bring your friends and neighbors!

October 13, 2017 at 11:56 am Leave a comment

The 28-Day Plastic Purge Challenge

plastic-purge-challenge
The aim of our 28-Day Plastic Purge is not to completely banish plastic, but to help you ID the most toxic and uneccesary sources like vinyl and single-use plastics, respectively.
Read The 28-Day Plastic Purge Challenge at Rodale Wellness.

October 11, 2017 at 10:49 am Leave a comment

UN World Food Day Sunday October 15.

Sunday, October 15, 1:00-3:30 Benson Centre 800 7th Street W “Seed the Untold Story”, movie screening;You are invited to enjoy free soup, cornbread and tea, film screening, discussion and a seed saving workshop. Everyone (including families and children) welcome. Schedule:
1pm: welcome with soup, cornbread, and tea
1:30pm: Film (54mins) – Seed: The Untold Story
2:30pm Discussion, break
2:45pm Seed saving workshop by Anke, supported by other TC+ people
3:30pm end

October 6, 2017 at 12:35 pm Leave a comment

Catholic church to make record divestment from fossil fuels

More than 40 Catholic institutions are to announce the largest ever faith-based divestment from fossil fuels, on the anniversary of the death of St Francis of Assisi.

The sum involved has not been disclosed but the volume of divesting groups is four times higher than a previous church record, and adds to a global divestment movement, led by investors worth $5.5tn.

Christiana Figueres, the former UN climate chief who helped negotiate the Paris climate agreement, hailed Tuesday’s move as “a further sign we are on the way to achieving our collective mission”.

She said: “I hope we will see more leaders like these 40 Catholic institutions commit, because while this decision makes smart financial sense, acting collectively to deliver a better future for everybody is also our moral imperative.”

Read Catholic church to make record divestment from fossil fuels by Arthur Nelsen at The Guardian.

October 4, 2017 at 10:07 am Leave a comment

Use Plants to Clean up Toxic Waste

In the last couple of centuries, humans have done a strange thing: We’ve dug the biggest pits, the deepest holes, and the longest tunnels the world has ever seen, all to find the most insidious and subtle poisons known to our mammalian bodies, remove them from deep inside rocks where they had lain sequestered for eons, and concentrate them in the places where most of us live. We’re starting to think this maybe wasn’t a good idea.

I say “we,” of course, but this isn’t a guilt trip; most of this was before your time, and you didn’t vote for it anyway. You and I use small amounts of heavy metals and fossil fuels in our own lives – driving, flying, heating, buying plastic products, just looking at this on a computer – but it’s very difficult to avoid doing so and still living in the modern world.

The consequence of so many people doing so many of these things, though, is that any urban area – and many rural ones – will have splotches on the map with large quantities of toxic materials in the ground. If you live where a gasoline station used to be, or a factory, a garbage dump, or any number of other things, you might have things in your soil you don’t want in your stroganof.

Read Use Plants to Clean up Toxic Waste by Brian Kaller at Resilience.org

October 2, 2017 at 10:27 am Leave a comment

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