Annual Christmas Market

November 17, 9-2 Canadian Legion 167 Queen Street, Chesterville,

Annual Christmas Market hosted by Chesterville Farmer’s Market.

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November 16, 2018 at 12:48 pm Leave a comment

SONGS AND MUSIC OF THE WW1 ERA

Sunday November 18,  2-4pm in the Cornwall Public Library, SONGS & MUSIC OF THE WORLD WAR I ERA offered by Genealogy and Archives Saint-Laurent and Duo-Clarpian. No charge. Please reserved your seat at 613-932-4796.

November 9, 2018 at 10:27 pm Leave a comment

Degrowth in the suburbs

So what would become of the suburbs if we gave up fossil fuels and moved toward a low-energy, post-carbon society beyond growth?

Suburban catastrophists like James Kunstler in the US argue that fossil fuel depletion will imminently render the suburban landscape an inhospitable wasteland. Such curdled imaginations fail to recognise suburbia’s latent capacity to become something new.

Inspired by research and advocacy from the likes of Ivan IllichDavid Holmgren, and Ted Trainer, we see the suburbs as an ideal place to begin retrofitting our cities according to a new vision of prosperity. 

Read Degrowth in the suburbs by Dr Samuel Alexander and Brendan Gleeson at Ecologist.

November 7, 2018 at 12:11 pm Leave a comment

It’s time to talk about We

While change at a local level has created practical pieces of a regenerative culture; what an initiative that has emerged from the Stockholm Resilience Centre called seeds of a Good Anthropocene. [https://goodanthropocenes.net/], we have failed to significantly and measurably move the big picture.

From my time working with Transition groups all around the world, I have seen these issues present in just about every Transition group. They lead me to ask whether we are working in the right way, or whether we are asking the right questions, or working in a way that will ultimately produce change, or whether the structure of the Industrial Growth System somehow prevents fundamental systemic change. Here are some of the main stumbling blocks.

Read It’s time to talk about We by Naresh Giangrande at The Transition Network.

November 5, 2018 at 11:46 am Leave a comment

Girls Night Out Fundraiser for Williamstown Public School

Thursday, November 15, 2018 there will be a GIRLS NIGHT OUT – a fundraiser for Williamstown Public School, organised by the Optimist Club of Lancaster at the St. Mary’s Centre in Williamstown.

Doors open at 5:30 PM with a cash bar. Dinner at 7 PM.  Tickets are $50 each and include your dinner, wine with dinner, entertainment and automatic entry for door prizes being offered by the various vendors who will be there.

For tickets or more information please contact:  Anne Donkers: 613-577-7588 or Shannon Desgroseilleirs: 613-362-0949 or via the Facebook Page: Optimist Club of Lancaster.

November 2, 2018 at 1:15 pm Leave a comment

Not enough fruits, vegetables grown to feed global population a healthy diet: study

The world’s agriculture producers are not growing enough fruits and vegetables to feed the global population a healthy diet, according to new Canadian-led research.

The study, published this week in the scientific journal PLOS ONE, indicates that agricultural practices aren’t keeping step with prevailing dietary wisdom, greatly overproducing grains, sugars and fats while growing three times less produce than what nutritionists suggest everyone should consume.

The study, led by researchers at the University of Guelph and completed by a team of more than a dozen scientists in Canada and the United Kingdom, also stressed that a focus on growing more fruits and vegetables should go hand in hand with reduced reliance on livestock production in order to limit the agriculture sector’s overall impact on the environment.

Read Not enough fruits, vegetables grown to feed global population a healthy diet: study by at The Globe and Mail.

October 31, 2018 at 10:42 am Leave a comment

Reducing Your Carbon Footprint Still Matters

We don’t recommend taking personal actions like limiting plane rides, eating less meat, or investing in solar energy because all of these small tweaks will build up to enough carbon savings (though it could help). We do so because people taking action in their personal lives is actually one of the best ways to get to a society that implements the policy-level change that is truly needed. Research on social behavior suggests lifestyle change can build momentum for systemic change. Humans are social animals, and we use social cues to recognize emergencies. People don’t spring into action just because they see smoke; they spring into action because they see others rushing in with water. The same principle applies to personal actions on climate change.

Read Reducing Your Carbon Footprint Still Matters by Leor Hackel and Gregg Sparkman at Slate.

October 29, 2018 at 10:38 am Leave a comment

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